The Playlist • More Columbia Cylinders (1904–1905)

COL-31000-boxes.

EDWARD M. FAVOR: Bedelia

New York; released March 1904
Columbia XP Cylinder 32375

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HARRY TALLY: Goodbye, Sweet Old Manhattan Isle

New York; released November 1905
Columbia XP Cylinder 32812

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ARTHUR COLLINS: Pretty Little Dinah Jones

New York; released February 1904
Columbia XP Cylinder 32353

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BOB ROBERTS: By the Watermelon Vine

New York; released November 1904
Columbia XP Cylinder 32591

Vaughn De Leath and Jones & Hare Caricatures (1929)

Three of the most prolific radio and recording-studio artists of the late 1920s, as caricatured in Radio Revue (1929). Jones & Hare had recently lost their Happiness Candy Company sponsorship, along with rights to the “Happiness Boys” name.

MSP_radrev-29_vdl_j-h

American Record Co. / Hawthorne, Sheble & Prescott Ephemera (1906)

Work’s nearly wrapped up on Bill Bryant’s American Record Company, Hawthorne & Sheble, and International Record Company discographies, which will be released in a combined volume this Fall. In the meantime, here are a couple of interesting HS&P pieces from the March and April 1906 issues of The Talking Machine World. (Baby had a good ear — the “Blue Indian” discs do sound pretty terrific on the Zonophone!)
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MSP_arco-hsp_TMW_0306 MSP_arco-hsp_TMW-0406

Original Tuxedo Jazz Band Announcement (1925)

This announcement of the first (and last) Okeh releases by Oscar Celestin’s Original Tuxedo Jazz Band appeared in The Talking Machine World for April 15, 1925. Okeh recorded only three titles by the group, in New Orleans on January 23, 1925; “Playing at Spanish Fort” was appended to the band credit on the labels. In 1926 the band signed with Columbia.

MSP_tuxedo-jb_tmw-04-25Discographical details of the Celestin recordings can be found in Brian Rust’s Jazz and Ragtime Records, 1897-1942 (6th Edition), out-of-print in book form by available from Mainspring Press as a searchable CD-ROM.

The Playlist • Cardboard Records: Hit of the Week (1930–1931)

MSP_how-durium-composite.

FREDDIE RICH’S RADIO ORCHESTRA (vcl: Elmer Feldkamp & Trio): Little Girl

New York: August 1931
Hit of the Week J-4

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FREDDIE RICH’S RADIO ORCHESTRA (vcl: Elmer Feldkamp & Trio): It’s the Girl

New York: August 1931
Hit of the Week K-1

Featured soloists on these sides include Bunny Berigan (trumpet); Tommy Dorsey (trombone); Artie Shaw (clarinet); Joe Venuti (violin); and Eddie Lang (guitar). Complete personnel can be found in Brian Rust’s Jazz & Ragtime Records, 1897-1942, out-of-print in book form but available from Mainspring Press in a searchable CD-ROM edition.

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EDDIE CANTOR with PHIL SPITALNY’S ORCHESTRA: Cheer Up

New York: September 1931
Durium De Luxe K-6

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HARRY RESER’S RADIO BAND (as THE NEW YORK TWELVE): You’re Driving Me Crazy (vcl: Frank Luther)

New York: December 29, 1930
Hit of the Week 1121

Coming This Fall: Pathé-Perfect, American Record Co., Hawthorne & Sheble, and International Record Co. (+ Grey Gull–Cameo Update)

Forthcoming Titles for Fall 2014
(Release Dates to Be Announced)

HSP-cover-x5The first comprehensive discographies of the American Record Co. (the highly collectible “Blue Indian” discs), including corresponding U.S. and foreign client-label issues; the Hawthorne & Sheble Manufacturing Co. (Star, Clarion, Harmony, Sir Henri, et al., including details of the source Columbia recordings); and the International Record Co. (Excelsior, International, Boston Symphony Record, The Buckeye Record, Faultless Concert Record, Kalamazoo, Nightingale Parlor Grand, and so many others). Includes extensive illustrated and documented histories of each company. (Quality softcover, approx. 300 pgs)

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PATHE-cover-x5Volume I in the two-volume Pathé-Perfect Discography covers all Pathé issues that have  corresponding Perfect issues, along with all corresponding American subsidiary and client-label issues, in the Race Record, Popular Vocal (including Star Series), Standard / Miscellaneous, and Classical / Operatic series. Volume II, covering the Dance series, will release in 2015. Includes an illustrated and documented history of the American Pathé operation. (Quality softcover, approx. 360 pgs)

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GREY GULL AND PRE-PATHE CAMEO DISCOGRAPHIES — Update: The Grey Gull and pre-Pathé period Cameo discographies, originally planned as books, will instead be incorporated as modules within the Mainspring Master Database (currently in development and programming stages), rather than being published in printed form. The later (Pathé-related) Cameo data appears in The Pathé–Perfect Discography.

The Playlist • New Orleans Owls (1926)

COL-1045D_owls.

NEW ORLEANS OWLS: Pretty Baby

New Orleans: April 14, 1926
Columbia 1045-D (mx. W 142022 – 1)

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NEW ORLEANS OWLS: White Ghost Shivers

Atlanta: November 6, 1926
Columbia 862-D (mx. W 143112 – 2)

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NEW ORLEANS OWLS: Piccadilly

New Orleans: April 14, 1926
Columbia 1158-D (mx. W 142019 – 3)

110 Years Ago at the Victor Talking Machine Co. — The July 1904 Catalog

Courtesy of John Bolig, author of The Victor Discography Series

VIC-SUPPS_jul-04

The Playlist • King Oliver’s Dixie Syncopators

OLIVER-composite-small.

KING OLIVER & HIS DIXIE SYNCOPATORS (as SAVANNAH SYNCOPATORS):
Wa Wa Wa

Chicago: May 29, 1929
Brunswick 3373 (mx. C 372, renumbered from Vocalion mx. E 3181)

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KING OLIVER & HIS DIXIE SYNCOPATORS: Aunt Hagar’s Blues

New York: September 10, 1928
Brunswick 80080  (dubbed reissue from mx. E 28186 -; originally Vocalion 1225)

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KING OLIVER & HIS DIXIE SYNCOPATORS: Slow and Steady

New York: November 14, 1928
Brunswick 4469 (mx. E 28757 -)

The selected takes for the last two selections are not indicated in the pressings or files (two takes of each title were made).

The Emerson $3 Phonograph (1915)

This 1915 ad for the $3 Emerson phonograph is especially interesting for its mention of upcoming 7″ discs by Caruso, McCormack, Ruffo, and Elman. Emerson had already issued a 5″ snippet from one of Caruso’s AICC cylinders, licensed through and dubbed by Pathé. None of the artists mentioned here (who were all under exclusive Victor contract in the U.S. at this time) are known to have ever appeared on a 7″ Emerson record.

This is also the earliest known mention of an Emerson–Plaza Music Company connection — the beginning of a complicated relationship that included Plaza’s takeover by Sol Kronberg and Herman Germain, of Emerson’s former Regal Record Company subsidiary.

emerson-3-dollar

Andy Sannella Feature Article (1930)

Love him or detest him, it’s hard to ignore Andy Sannella if you collect late 1920s pop records. For better or worse, he’s all over the recordings of that period, from high-end to bottom-feeder labels. Early discographers, at a loss as to what to call his sleep-deprived  group of studio critters, hit upon “Grey Gull house band,” which doesn’t really work — The same  group recorded for numerous other labels (even the good ones, as documented in the Victor, Columbia, and Brunswick files) and was equally active in radio work, if not more so.

At any rate, here’s a feature article on Sannella, with a great caricature, that ran in the February 1930 edition of Radio Revue:

sannella-radio-rev

Mainspring Press Website Articles • Linked Contents

smallLogo-10YEARMAINSPRING PRESS WEBSITE ARTICLES
For Collectors of Vintage Sound

This index has been moved to its own page — Click here, or on the “Links to Other  Online Articles” tab at the top of this page.

The Playlist • Obscure Harlem Bands (1929–1930)

Three little bands that likely existed only in the recording studios. Banjoist Elmer Snowden recalled being in the first two, which apparently were booked by publisher-producer Joe Davis (who had worked with Snowden since his Ajax days). Published personnel listings vary considerably on these; according to Snowden, “Davis used to throw in so many musicians, I couldn’t keep track,” so we’ll leave it at that.

These transfers are from blank-labeled vinyl pressings off the original stampers (issued takes), probably made in the 1960s as CBS’s master-scrapping drive loomed on the horizon.

snowdenElmer Snowden in the mid-1920s

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JUNGLE TOWN STOMPERS: African Jungle

New York: April 15, 1929
Custom vinyl pressing from Okeh mx. W 401798 – B

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MUSICAL STEVEDORES: Honeycomb Harmony

New York: January 30, 1929
Custom vinyl pressing from Columbia mx. W 147900 – 3

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BENNETT’S SWAMPLANDERS: Big Ben

New York: September 5, 1930
Custom vinyl pressing from Columbia mx. W 150767 – 2

Play Discs on Your Cylinder Phonograph: The Devineau Biophone (Cleveland, 1907)

From The Talking Machine World. Have any of these contraptions survived?

devineau-1907