For Sale: Copyright and Exclusive Production and Publication Rights to Brian Rust’s “Jazz Records,” Including the Exclusive Right to Publish Revised Editions

Mainspring Press LLC is soliciting offers for purchase of the copyright and exclusive worldwide production, publication, and sales rights to the late Brian Rust’s Jazz and Ragtime Records, 1897–1942 (6th Edition), which includes the author’s contractual grant of exclusive rights to produce, publish, and sell any and all revised editions of this work.

This offer presents an outstanding opportunity for the purchaser to revise and remake this important work in any way they see fit, with excellent profit potential as no other party may legally produce or sell revised editions of Jazz and Ragtime Records or its contents.

Scope of the Offering — The following are included in this sale. Items preceded by an asterisk (*) were contractually assigned to Mainspring Press by Brian Rust per our Publishing Agreement of December 23, 2001, which was agreed to and accepted by Mr. Rust on January 8, 2002, and which currently remains in effect:

  • *Exclusive copyright in the work (contractually assigned to Mainspring Press)
  • *Exclusive worldwide publication and production rights to the work in any form (print, digital, or other).
  • *Exclusive worldwide sales and marketing rights to the work in any form.
  • *Exclusive rights to edit or otherwise alter or revise the work in any form.
  • *Exclusive worldwide rights to produce, publish, market, and sell, in any form, all subsequent editions of the work, employing editors, authors, and contributors of the purchaser’s choosing, without the need for consultation with or permission from the Rust Estate.
  • Original book-production files in PageMaker 7 format (exportable to InDesign, Word, Acrobat, etc.)
  • Original CD-production files in Adobe Acrobat 5.0 Pro (exportable to Word, other versions of Acrobat and Reader, etc.)

This offering does not include the physical books (which are out-of-stock) or CDs (which are currently produced only on-demand). Upon completion of the sale and final clearance of payment, Mainspring Press will formally relinquish all claims to the work and will immediately discontinue all production, marketing, and sales of the work.

Obligations to the Rust Estate — Per our Publishing Agreement of December 23, 2001,  the purchaser will be obligated to the Rust Estate for the following:

  • Quarterly royalty payments to the Estate of 15% (print editions) or 30% (CD/digital editions) on net sales of the work, including sales of subsequent editions. (Note that the Executor, who resides in the UK, will accept payment via PayPal if desired.)
  • In the event only of publication of a new revised edition: A $6,000 advance (loan) against royalties to the Estate payable, in three equal increments. (Note that in the case of the 6th Edition, the publisher fully recouped the advance within three months of publication.) No advance is required for continued publication of the 6th Edition.

Exclusive Agreement —Mainspring Press LLC certifies that it holds the sole legal right to dispose of the copyright, intellectual property rights, publications rights, and all other rights, obligations, and materials related to this work, per its Publishing Agreement with Brian Rust of December 23, 2001. Mainspring Press further certifies: (1) That no publication or production rights, intellectual-property rights, or copyrights in this work have ever been granted to any other party; (2) That Mainspring Press’ previous sales-partnership agreement with Malcolm Shaw, which conveyed only shared sales rights in the work, and  no other rights of any kind, was nullified by mutual agreement in 2003 and is fully vacated; and (3) That there are no other agreements or encumbrances of any kind in effect in regard to this work.

Inquiries and Offers — Serious inquiries and preliminary non-binding offers or proposals should be submitted in writing (no phone calls, e-mail, or texts) before December 1, 2015, to the address below. Please note that the complete contents of the Publishing Agreement and related documentation will be disclosed only to parties who, in our estimation, possess the intent, ability, and necessary resources to negotiate in good faith.

Mainspring Press LLC
Re: Rights Administration
PO Box 631277
Littleton, CO 80163-4421

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Heading to Press This Week: Leeds & Catlin / American Record Co. / Hawthorne & Sheble (Star) / International Record Co.

LEEDS & CATLIN RECORDS: A History and Discography

AMERICAN RECORD COMPANY, HAWTHORNE & SHEBLE, and INTERNATIONAL RECORD COMPANY: Histories and Discographies, 1904–1909

Data Compiled by William R. Bryant / Edited and Annotated by Allan Sutton

Two of Mainspring’s most interesting discographies are heading to press this week and will release in mid-October. These companies were persistent thorns in the side of Victor and Columbia, infringing their patents and often undercutting their prices. Ultimately they were defeated in the courts, but not before producing many intriguing (and often quite rare) records that are favorites with modern collectors.

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HSP-Leeds-covers.

These unique volumes are the first systematic, professionally produced studies of these companies and their recorded output. They have been compiled from careful first-hand inspection of the original discs, catalogs, and other primary-source materials, involving input from more than one-hundred trusted collectors, dealers, and archivists over the course of many decades, all newly updated and annotated. Listings include all confirmed subsidiary and client-label issues (U.S. and foreign), composer and show credits, identification of anonymous performers, confirmed listing dates, alternate versions and remakes, and other significant data.

The Leeds & Catlin volume also includes detailed discographical data for the imported Favorite recordings that were used on Leeds’ Imperial Grand Opera Records, as well as a provisional listing of Leeds & Catlin and Radium cylinders. The Star Records (Hawthorne & Sheble) listing includes data on the source Columbia recordings.

In addition to the extensive discographies, each volume features illustrated histories of the people and companies behind these labels — the most detailed and objective accounts yet, far surpassing what appears in any previously published work. Full documentation is included, with more than 110 primary-source citations in the Leeds history alone. Other features include individual user’s guides and title and artist indexes for each company.

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Concurrent Release: Mid-October 2015
Format: 7″ x 10″ quality paperback
Pages: Approximately 280 each
Projected Price (U.S): $45 each (ordered individually) / $85 for both (ordered as set)
Shipping (U.S.): Free

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The Playlist • More Roots of Western Swing (1937–1938)

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THE RANGE RIDERS: The Range Riders’ Stomp

Hot Springs, Arkansas: March 1, 1937
Vocalion 03579 (mx. HS-1 – 1)

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MODERN MOUNTAINEERS (SMOKY WOOD, vocal): Dirty Dog Blues

San Antonio, Texas (Texas Hotel): March 1, 1937
Bluebird B-6976 (mx. BS 07436 – 1)

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CLAUDE CASEY & HIS PINE STATE PLAYBOYS: Pine State Honky Tonk

Rock Hill, South Carolina (Andrew Jackson Hotel): September 27, 1938
Montgomery Ward M-7707 (mx.BS 027737 – 1)

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BOB WILLS & HIS TEXAS PLAYBOYS: Playboy Stomp

Dallas, Texas: June 7, 1937
Vocalion 03854 (mx. DAL 215 – 1)

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All compositions are in the public domain.

The Playlist • Jabbo Smith (1929), with Personnel Listings from Jabbo Himself

MSP_bwk_7078b Photo supplied by the late Mike Stewart.

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The personnel shown here were recalled by Jabbo Smith during the course of his 1966 visit (at age 57) with Dick Spottswood, one of the most rigorous researchers in the field, and the man largely responsible for Jabbo’s rediscovery. They differ significantly from those listed in Jazz Records by Brian Rust, who as usual didn’t state his source(s). The personnel (other than Smith) and takes used are not indicated in the surviving Brunswick documentation or on inspected pressings.

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“BANJO” IKEY ROBINSON & HIS BULL FIDDLE BAND: Got Butter On It

Chicago (Brunswick S. Wabash Avenue studio): January 4, 1929
Brunswick 7057 (mx. C 2747 – )

Jabbo Smith (trumpet / vocal); Ikey Robinson (guitar). Smith could not recall the other musicians; those listed in Rust apparently are speculative, although not disclosed as such. Credited to “Ikey Robinson & his Jabbo Band” on the original Brunswick recording sheet.

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“BANJO” IKEY ROBINSON & HIS BULL FIDDLE BAND: Ready Hokum

Chicago (Brunswick S. Wabash Avenue studio): January 22, 1929
Brunswick 7057 (mx. C 2844 – )

Jabbo Smith (trumpet / vocal); Ikey Robinson (guitar). Smith could not recall the other musicians; those listed in Rust are apparently speculative, although not disclosed as such.

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JABBO SMITH & HIS RHYTHM ACES: Sau Sha Stomp

Chicago (Brunswick S. Wabash Avenue studio): March 1, 1929
Brunswick 7065 (mx. C 3029 – )

Jabbo Smith (trumpet); Willard Brown (alto sax); Cassino Simpson (piano); Ikey Robinson (banjo); Lawson Buford (brass bass)

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JABBO SMITH & HIS RHYTHM ACES: Decatur Street Tutti

Chicago (Brunswick S. Wabash Avenue studio): April 4, 1929
Brunswick 7078 (mx. C 3233 – )

Jabbo Smith (trumpet / vocal); Willard Brown (alto sax); Earl Frazer (piano); Ikey Robinson (banjo); Lawson Buford (brass bass). Label photo (above) and tape dubbing courtesy of the late Mike Stewart.

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JABBO SMITH & HIS RHYTHM ACES: Band Box Stomp

Chicago (Brunswick Furniture Mart Building studio): August 22, 1929
Brunswick 7111 (mx. C 4100 – )

Jabbo Smith (trumpet); Willard Brown (saxes); Earl Frazer (piano); Ikey Robinson (banjo); Lawson Buford (brass bass)

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The Playlist • Getting Hot in Dallas (1929)

MSP_bwk-4644_harris.

HARRIS BROTHERS TEXANS: Gut Bucket Shuffle

Dallas: October 1929
Brunswick 4644 (mx. DAL 542 – A or B)

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[DURWARD] CLINE’S COLLEGIANS: Chicadore Stomp

Dallas: November 1929
Brunswick mx. DAL 571 – A (commercially unissued in 78 form)
From a c. 1960s custom vinyl pressing of the original stamper

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HERMAN WALDMAN & HIS ORCHESTRA: Marbles

Dallas: November 1929
Brunswick 4649 (mx. DAL 567 – A or B)

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Brunswick’s Dallas recording ledgers for this period are fragmentary. The takes selected for the first and third selections are not indicated on the labels or in the surviving documentation.

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The Playlist • Yiddish Vocal and Klezmer Favorites (1913 – 1923)

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AARON LEBEDEFF (vocal with ABE SCHWARTZ’S ORCHESTRA):
Ich Bin a Border Bei Mein Weib

New York: c. January 1923
Vocalion 14502  (mx. 10587)

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ABE SCHWARTZ’S ORCHESTRA: Sher — Part 2

New York: October 1920
Columbia E4905  (mx. 86692 – 1)

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HARRY KANDEL’S ORCHESTRA: Rusiche Shaer (Russian Dance) —  Part 1

New York: June 25, 1918
Victor 72102  (mx. B 21666 – 4)

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JACOB HOFFMAN (xylophone) with HARRY KANDEL’S ORCHESTRA:
Doina and Hora

Camden, NJ: January 25, 1923Camden, NJ: January 25, 1923
Victor 77163  (mx. B 28671 – 1)

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MORDECAI HERSHMAN (vocal): Mikita

New York: June 14, 1923
Victor 68625  (mx. C 28084 – 2)
Nathaniel Shilkret, arranger / conductor

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PINCHOS JASSINOWSKY (vocal): Burekes

New York: October 10, 1919
Victor 72308  (mx. B 22352 – 3)
Nathaniel Shilkret, organ

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ABE ELENKRIG’S ORCHESTRA: Fon der Choope

New York: c. April 4, 1913
Columbia E1393  (mx. 38756 – 1)

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ABRAHAM ELENKRIG’S ORCHESTRA: Machotonim zum Tisch

New York: c. April 4, 1913
Columbia E1394  (mx. 38758 – 1)

 

ABE SCHWARTZ’S ORCHESTRA (as Oriental Orchestra): The Silver Wedding

New York: c. August 1918
Columbia E3618  (mx. 58541-1)

Sousa’s Band in Stereo (1900)

Of the visual variety, that is. This Keystone stereoview shows Sousa and his band performing up-close-and-personal at the 1900 Paris Exposition. It appears to be a considerably smaller group than his later behemoth organization. Presumably, Arthur Pryor is down there, somewhere.

MSP_sousa-1900_stereoview

The Playlist • Some Late 1920s Goofiness

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HARRY RESER’S SIX JUMPING JACKS (speech by TOM STACKS with LARRY ABBOTT & HARRY RESER): Etiquette Blues

New York (Brunswick Studios, Room #1): May 16, 1928
Brunswick 3940 (mx. E 27558 – A or B)
The selected take is not shown on the pressings or in the Brunswick files, which lists a seven-man band (plus Reser as an “extra”) in this case.

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BANJO BUDDY (HAROLD SANDELMAN) (orchestra directed by WILLIAM WIRGES):
Let’s Misbehave

New York (Brunswick Studios, Room #2; “Mr. Daulton monitoring”): March 7, 1928
Brunswick 3865 (mx. E 26855 or E 26856)
The selected take is not shown on the pressings or in the Brunswick files.

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SLATZ RANDALL & HIS ORCHESTRA (vocal by JOE ROBERTS):
Bessie Couldn’t Help It

Minneapolis: March 1929
Brunswick 4331 (mx. MP 34 – B)
Through some clerical mix-up, the Brunswick files list this as an Eddie Dunstedter pipe-organ solo session, although the titles and vocalists are listed correctly. The error wasn’t caught in Laird’s Brunswick Records (Greenwood Press).

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Master Database Update

Work is proceeding steadily on the Mainspring Master Database (working title), which eventually will document the complete output of numerous pre-1940 record companies. It is being populated largely with data compiled from first-hand inspection of the original discs and associated primary-source materials by the late Bill Bryant and the Record Research associates (Walter C. Allen, Len Kunstadt, Carl Kendziora, Perry Armagnac, George Blacker, et al.), to which Mainspring acquired exclusive rights in 2011, along with input from a large group of trusted collectors, dealers, and archivists.

The data-entry screen for discs was recently revised to allow for finer detail. As you’ll see, proper documentation of sourcesthe weak spot in so many published discographies — is of paramount importance in this project.

You’ll also notice that the screen does not yet have check-boxes for groove type — lateral-cut, universal-cut, and the various forms of vertical-cut. At present, we’re working only on lateral recordings; groove types will be added once we begin to work with other cuts. In addition, band personnel from reliable primary sources (company files, contractors’ session and payroll logs, etc.) will be added during a later phase of the project. We will not be including any conjectural, undocumented, or otherwise questionable  band personnel from secondary works, such as Jazz Records or American Dance Bands.

Here are two preliminary entries from the Plaza-ARC module, which we expect to complete in 2016 (click below to see a larger image):
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MMD will be a purely digital product with advanced searching, sorting, and querying functions, along with the ability to revise or add entries on-the-fly.The database eventually will consist of multiple linked modules covering virtually all pre-1940 American record producers (disc and cylinder) for which the original recording files are incomplete or missing entirely.

We are currently seeking a highly qualified partner or partners to assist with securing funding, developing a distribution model (preferably including mobile-device compatibility), and completing the programming in anticipation of launching the initial modules online in 2017.

 

The Playlist • Harlem Bands on Grey Gull (1929–1930)

More hot black groups from the notoriously cheap Grey Gull label. Actual identities of these pseudonymous groups and their members remain unknown; some personnel listed in Jazz Records and derivative or similar works (including the tin-eared notion that several of GG’s usual white studio hacks are present) have been pretty well debunked in recent years. However, it does seem likely that J.C. Johnson, Porter Grainger, and Claude Austin were at least peripherally involved with the August 1929, November 1929, and January 1930 recordings, respectively, as they composed all titles recorded at those sessions.

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MSP_GG-1767-1803-comp.

MOONLIGHT REVELERS: Memphis Stomp

New York: c. August 1929
Grey Gull 1786  (mx. 3607– A)

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MOONLIGHT REVELERS: Baby Knows How

New York: c. August 1929
Grey Gull 1767 (mx. 3608 – B)

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JAZZOPATORS: Don’t Know and Don’t Care

New York: c. November 1929
Grey Gull 1803  (mx. 3741-A)

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MEMPHIS JAZZERS: Ev’rybody Dance

New York: c. November 1929
Grey Gull 1816 (mx. 3742 – B)

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MEMPHIS JAZZERS: Miss Golden Brown

New York: c. November 1929
Grey Gull 1805 (mx. 3743 – B)

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MEMPHIS JAZZERS: In Harlem’s Araby

New York: c. November 1929
Grey Gull 1804 (mx. 3744 – B)

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LEVEE SYNCOPATORS: The Rackett

New York: c. January 1930
Grey Gull 1843 (mx. 3843 – B)

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NEW ORLEANS PEPSTERS: The Harlem Stomp Down

New York: c. January 1930
Van Dyke 81836 [ = Grey Gull 1836]  (mx. 3844 – A)

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The Playlist • James P. Johnson Piano Solos (1923–1930)

MSP_col-A3950-81100.

JAMES P. JOHNSON: Worried and Lonesome Blues

New York: June 28, 1923
Columbia A3950 (mx. 81100 – 2)

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JAMES P. JOHNSON: Riffs

New York: January 29, 1929
Okeh 8770 (mx. W 401565 – B)

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JAMES P. JOHNSON: You’ve Got to Be Modernistic

New York: January 21, 1930
Brunswick 4762 (mx. E 31958 – A or B*)
*The issued take is not indicated in the Brunswick files or on the pressings.

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The Playlist • Bill Cox (1933) / Bill Cox & Cliff Hobbs (1937)

MSP_voc-04077-21910.

BILL COX & CLIFF HOBBS: Mollie Rinktum

New York: October 19, 1937
Vocalion 04077 (mx. 21910 – 1)

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BILL COX: Ramblin’ Hobo

New York: August 30, 1933
Melotone M-13007 (mx. 13899 – 1)

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BILL COX: Midnight Special

New York: August 30, 1933
Melotone M-12797 (mx. 13897 – 2)

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The Playlist • Helen Rowland on “Hit Of The Week” Records (1931)

Not the popular New York World columnist of the same name and period, but a now largely forgotten radio singer and actress. At the time these recordings were made, Helen Rowland was being featured with Don Voorhees’ Maxwell House Ensemble over station WJZ. In December 1932, she was hired to replace Rosalyn Silber in “The Rise of the Goldbergs” radio show, only to be unceremoniously dismissed after Silber reclaimed her spot several months later. A nasty legal scuffle ensued, spearheaded by Rowland’s mother, and in July 1933 she was called back to replace a reportedly ailing Silber. But it was a Pyrrhic victory at best, with word of the Rowlands’ strong-arm tactics quickly spreading among radio executives, and her career largely stalled in the later 1930s.

These selections are from 15¢ Hit of the Week records, the history of which is covered in detail in Recording the ‘Thirties, available from Mainspring Press and many major libraries.

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ERNO RAPEE’S ORCHESTRA w/ HELEN ROWLAND: River, Stay ’Way from My Door & Some Of These Days

New York: c. December 1931
Hit of the Week M-5-A-1 (mx. 1135 – C)

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PHIL SPITALNY’S MUSIC w/ HELEN ROWLAND: When It’s Sleepy Time
Down South

New York: c. December 1931
Hit of the Week A-1-2 (mx. 1186 – B)
Note: This transfer deletes the second track (“Sailing”), on which Rowland is not present.

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FREDDIE RICH’S RADIO BAND w/ HELEN ROWLAND: You Call It Madness

New York: c. November–December 1931
Hit of the Week M-2 (mx: see note)
Note: This transfer deletes the second track (“Auld Lang Syne”), on which Rowland is not present. All copies we’ve seen show M-218 (which probably is just a control number) in the mx-number position; mxs. 336, 364, and 1237 have all been reported in various works!

108 Years Ago at the Victor Talking Machine Co. • New Victor Records for July 1907

Courtesy of John Bolig

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The Playlist • More Forgotten Vaudevillians: Bert Williams’ Imitators (1921–1924)

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SHELTON BROOKS: Murder in the First Degree

New York: c. April 1921 — Released: July 1921
Okeh 4340 (mx. S 7878 – A)
With “Rega Orchestra” (Okeh studio orchestra conducted by Fred Hager)

Neither F. Wallace Rega nor Milo Rega were actual recording artists or conductors, contrary to some discographies.“F. Wallace Rega” was a pseudonym for Fred Hager, as confirmed in the federal Catalog of Copyright Entries. “Milo Rega” was a composite alias (“Justin Milo” being a pseudonym for Justin Ring, which in turn was the professional name of Justus Ringleben), as disclosed in the same source.

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HAM TREE HARRINGTON: Nobody Never Let Me In on Nothin’

New York: March 11, 1924 — Released: June 1924
Brunswick 2588 (mx. 12674, 12675, or 12676*)
With uncredited orchestra (conductor unlisted in files)

*The selected take is not shown on the pressings or in the Brunswick files.

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EDDIE HUNTER (piano by C. LUCKEYTH “LUCKEY” ROBERTS): Hard Times

Camden, NJ: November 16, 1923 — Released: July 18, 1924; Deleted: 1926
Victor 19359 (mx. B 28897 – 2)

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Capsule Biographies from the Mainspring Press Website:

Shelton Brooks
Shelton Brooks, with his prodigious skill as a songwriter and two successful decades on stage, is an undeservedly forgotten pioneer in black entertainment. Born in Amherstburg, Ontario (not Amesburg, as cited in Rust’s Complete Entertainment Discography) in 1886, Brooks left school in the early 1900s to play piano in Detroit cafes. His first break as a songwriter came when Sophie Tucker introduced his composition, “Some of these Days,” which she recorded in 1911 (Amberol 691). Over the next decade, Brooks wrote a string of hits that included “There’ll Come a Time” (1911), “Ruff Johnson’s Harmony Band” (1914), “The Darktown Strutter’s Ball” (1916), “Walkin’ the Dog” (1917), and “Saturday” (1921). By 1915, Brooks was touring successfully on the Keith and Orpheum vaudeville circuits as a Williams mimic.

In 1922 Brooks was featured as the master of ceremonies in Plantation Revue with Florence Mills (opened July 17, 1922). A European tour with Lew Leslie’s Blackbirds — including a royal command performance before George V — followed in 1923, but in November of that year Brooks returned to the United States. He co-starred with Ham Tree Harrington and Florence Mills in the Broadway production of Dixie to Broadway (opened October 29, 1924). A review of the show in The Messenger for January 1925 predicted that Brooks was “in a fair way to surpass the late Bert Williams, if he can find a producer who can keep him at work and give him his head.”

Apparently, Brooks didn’t find that producer, and he began to fade from public notice after his Okeh recording contract ended in late 1926. There were more vaudeville appearances, including a 1928 tour with band leader Ollie Powers, but in 1931 Brooks made his final appearance in a Broadway musical, a long-running production of Brown Buddies (opened October 7, 1930), with Bill Robinson, Adelaide Hall, and Ada Brown. He died in 1975.

Okeh released 27 sides by Brooks from early 1921 through late 1926 that ran the gamut from comic routines to Williams-style recitations of his own songs and included one race-series release (Okeh 8062) with blues singer Sara Martin. In March 1922, the Chicago Defender announced that Brooks and several other popular black stars would make Echo records as soon as their current contracts expired. But no Echo records, by Brooks or anyone else, have ever surfaced.

Ham Tree Harrington
A diminutive and sometimes cantankerous individual, Ham Tree Harrington developed a following in the Harlem nightclubs, billing himself as “The Pint-Sized Bert Williams.” Louis Hooper, pianist and mainstay of the Elmer Snowden and Bob Fuller bands in the 1920s, recalled Harrington’s ongoing feud with cornet star Johnny Dunn in a 1966 Record Research interview: “Now Johnny was no trouble maker…but there was something on his mind he didn’t like about Ham Tree, and Harrington knew it. Dunn got up and…said something to Harrington. Ham Tree stood up and WHAM! He hit him! The next day they were still ribbing each other.”

After several years in vaudeville, Harrington got a major break with a starring role in the 1922 Broadway productions of Strut Miss Lizzie. Another feature role followed in 1924’s Dixie to Broadway with Shelton Brooks and Florence Mills, about which the New York Post commented, “Harrington pulls off one of his most original pantomimes of ghost-fright seen in a long day…it is effective beyond words.” Despite good reviews, Harrington returned to club and vaudeville work and didn’t appear in another Broadway musical until the ill-fated 1930 production of J.C. Johnson’s Change Your Luck, in which he co-starred with Alberta Hunter for all 17 performances.

Eddie Hunter
Thanks to his association with Alex Rogers (Williams’ collaborator as far back as 1900), Eddie Hunter is more closely linked to Bert Williams than the other performers listed here.

Hunter seems to have appeared on the scene suddenly, first attracting notice in 1923 for his starring role in the Broadway production of How Come? He also wrote the show’s libretto, which was criticized at the time for borrowing too liberally from Sissle & Blake’s Shuffle Along. The show opened on April 16, 1923 to generally poor reviews and ran for only 32 performances. The New York Sun huffed, “It’s getting dark on Broadway. But not very dark, as the young people who make up the personnel of How Come? have hardly the shade of darkness.”

Hunter’s next Broadway appearance came with newcomer Adelaide Hall in My Magnolia during the summer of 1925. Reviewers liked Hunter and Hall but weren’t enthusiastic about the show itself, which closed after only four performances. Hunter did not make another Broadway appearance until Blackbirds of 1933, in which he starred with Edith Wilson and Bill (Bojangles) Robinson. The show opened on December 2, 1933 but survived for only 25 performances.  More Eddie Hunter recordings…