The Playlist • More East Texas Serenaders (1928, 1937)

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EAST TEXAS SERENADERS: Acorn Stomp

Dallas: October 25, 1928
Brunswick 282 (mx. DAL 720)

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EAST TEXAS SERENADERS: Say a Little Prayer for Me

Dallas: February 20, 1937
Decca 5458 (mx. 61886 – A)

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EAST TEXAS SERENADERS: Arizona Stomp

Dallas: February 20, 1937
Decca 5375 (mx. 61890 – A)

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Early American Noise Pollution (1903–1904)

From various 1903–1904 issues of Edison Phonograph Monthly:

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The April 15th Playlist • Raymond Hitchcock on Income Tax (1914)

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RAYMOND HITCHCOCK: The Income Tax Law (excerpt from “Mr. Hitchcock’s Curtain Speech”)

New York: June 26, 1914
Excerpt from Victor 55046 (mx. C 15018 – 3)

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The Playlist • Don Murray with the Ted Lewis Band (1928–1929)

Clarinetist Don Murray is best remembered for his recordings with the likes of Bix Beiderbecke, but for a couple of years his work also graced some sides by Ted Lewis, who occasionally laid down his own clarinet and let Murray shine. Here are three of the best.

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TED LEWIS & HIS BAND: Jungle Blues

New York: April 3, 1928
Columbia 1525-D (mx. W 145954 – 4)

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TED LEWIS & HIS BAND (vcl. by Lewis): A Jazz Holiday

New York: April 3, 1928
Columbia 1525-D (mx. W 145953 – 3)

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TED LEWIS & HIS BAND (vcl. by Lewis): Maybe — Who Knows?

Los Angeles: May 26, 1929
Columbia 1854-D (mx. W 148562 – 3)
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Edison Two-Minute and Concert Cylinders (1897–1912): Going to Press Next Week

MSP_ed-2M_Releasing-May-2015EDISON TWO-MINUTE AND CONCERT CYLINDERS (1897–1912)

Compiled and annotated from the original Edison documentation by
ALLAN SUTTON
ARSC Lifetime Achievement Award Winner

At last, an authoritative guide to all issued versions of every two-minute and Concert cylinder in Edison’s American series, compiled from original company documentation and supplemented by data from leading collectors and researchers.

Previous Edison two-minute guides list only the first performer that recorded a given number. But as experienced collectors know, numbers were frequently remade, sometimes with entirely different performers, accompaniments, and/or announcers, as the old masters and molds wore out. You’ll find all of those iterations in this new guide, along with release and/or listing dates and deletion dates from the Edison materials.

An especially valuable feature is the inclusion of master-plating dates for brown-wax, Concert, and early Gold Moulded issues. The recording files for these cylinders are long-gone, but the factory plating logs provide reliable clues to approximate dates (Edison was indeed recording and stockpiling Gold Moulded masters en masse far in advance of the records’ introduction). Other fine details include flagging of early issues known to have been supplied by Walcutt & Leeds; composer and show credits; medley contents and interpolated songs; comments and personnel listings from early trade publications; and other features you won’t find in previously published guides.

Beside being a handy field guide to these records (which of course often lack artist credits or other identifiers on their rims), this new volume will help you distinguish rare “first editions” from later, more common remakes. It covers all of the American-catalog brown wax and Gold Moulded issues (including all confirmed remakes), the two-minute Grand Opera series, and the 5″ Concert Records in detail.

Also included is an illustrated history covering early Edison cylinder production and marketing, a user’s guide, and artist and title indexes. In the meantime, be sure to check out our other award-winning cylinderographiesEdison Amberol Cylinders, Edison Blue Amberol Cylinders, and Indestructible & U-S Everlating Cylinders — on the Mainspring Press website. And watch for more to come!

Approximately 400 pages • Illustrated • 7×10″ quality softcover • Releasing May 2015

The Playlist • Emanuel Feuermann Plays Dvorak’s Cello Concerto (1928 / 1929)

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EMANUEL FEUERMANN (cello) with Members of the Berlin State Opera Orchestra (Michael Taube, conductor): Concerto in B Minor, Op. 104 (Dvorak)

Berlin: April 30, 1928 (first and second movements)
Berlin: September 27, 1929 (third movement)


Columbia G-68037-D – G-68041-D
(mxs. W 2-20748 – 2-20753; W 2-21582 – W 2-21584)

Caution — Large file (32mb)

The Playlist • Hot Perfects (1923 – 1926)

cover-pathev2-x370NOW IN STOCK

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FLETCHER HENDERSON & HIS ORCHESTRA: Shanghai Shuffle

New York: Mid-October 1924 — Released December 1924
Perfect 14338 (mx. N-105607; plain take, dubbing #2)

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FRED RICH & HIS ORCHESTRA: Up and At ’Em

New York: April 1926 — Released August 1926
Perfect 14633 (mx. 106800; plain take, dubbing #1)

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CALIFORNIA RAMBLERS (as GOLDEN GATE ORCHESTRA):
Dusting the Donkey

New York: May 4, 1925 — Released August 1925
Perfect 14441 (mx. N-106004; plain take, dubbing #1)
Band identification and recording date are from Ed Kirkeby’s log.

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ORIGINAL MEMPHIS FIVE: Memphis Glide

New York: May 2, 1923 — Released July 1923

Perfect 14132 (mx. N-70157; plain take, dubbing #1)
Recording date is from Ed Kirkeby’s log.

 

 

Now in Stock: The Pathé – Perfect Discography, Vol. 2 (Dance Series, 1922–1930)

Volume 2 of The Pathé–Perfect Discography has just arrived. It covers the Dance Series, which ran the gamut from house-orchestra throwaways to some fine hot dance bands and outright jazz.

cover-pathev2-x370Special attention has been paid to the joint Pathé–Cameo–ARC issues. The Record Research group (Walter C. Allen, Len Kunstadt, George Blacker, Carl Kendziora, Perry Armagnac, et al.) used synchronized dual turntables and careful visual inspection of the original pressings to tackle alternate takes, false (assigned) master numbers, control numbers, artist pseudonyms, and other discographical complexities that are sometimes glossed-over, guessed-at, misunderstood, or simply gotten wrong in existing works.

The group published a skeletal Perfect Dance Series listing in RR many years ago, but they intended to publish their more detailed findings in book form, so the manuscript was kept under wraps before finally being passed on to Bill Bryant, following whose death it disappeared into storage. Now recovered and newly updated and annotated by Allan Sutton, the group’s detailed findings appear in print here for the first time. The result is a much-needed fresh look at these records that cites its sources and often supplements or corrects what is found in previously published dance-band discographies.

The Record Research group’s work has been supplemented by what remains of the original primary-source documentation, including the now-lost Form 19 Cards (which a member of the group fortunately copied), the Plaza-ARC and Compo Company ledgers, the Pathé and Perfect Dealer Advance Lists, and the logs of Ed Kirkeby and other contractors and musicians who worked with Pathé.

You’ll find this new volume as easy-to-use as it is informative. Every record (including all corresponding releases on U.S. client and subsidiary labels) has its own line, showing the exact, verbatim label credits and all relevant markings in the wax and on and under the labels for that issue, taken from first-hand inspection of the original discs — setting a new standard for completeness, accuracy, and discographer accountability.

Also included is a detailed user’s guide explaining Pathé’s recording and dubbing processes; their use of outside studios and licensed masters, particularly their relationship with Herbert Berliner and the Compo Company; the transfer procedures and assignment of master and take numbers between themselves and the Cameo and Plaza / American Record Corporation groups (there actually was some method to the seeming madness); real takes vs. dubbing numbers vs. irrelevant superscript digits posing as take numbers; and other fine points. (An illustrated history of the American Pathé operation appears in Volume I, which released last year.)
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The Playlist • Joe Venuti’s Blue Four (1927–1931)

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JOE VENUTI’S BLUE FOUR: The Wolf Wobble

New York: September 10, 1931
Parlophone R 1071 (mx. W 151792 – 1)

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JOE VENUTI’S BLUE FOUR: Four String Joe

New York: November 15, 1927
Parlophone R 109 (mx. W 81823 – C)

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JOE VENUTI’S BLUE FOUR: The Wild Dog

New York: March 28, 1928
Odeon O-31750 (mx. W[S] 400179 – A)

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The Photo Gallery • Byron G. Harlan at Home (c. 1919)

Bain News Service publicity shots of Byron G. Harlan, from the G.G. Bain Collection at the Library of Congress. The photographs probably were taken around 1919, by which time Harlan’s long and tremendously successful recording career was winding down.

MSP-BAIN_harlan-composite1

The Playlist • U-S Everlasting Cylinder Favorites (1910–1912)

cover_indestructible-x200For a detailed history of U-S Everlasting and its complete output, with 24 pages of color illustrations, be sure to check out Indestructible and U-S Everlasting Cylinders: An Illustrated History and Cylinderography, available from Mainspring Press and many major libraries.

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GIUSEPPE PIMAZZONI: Carmen — Canzone del Toreador

662 Sixth Avenue, New York; released 1911
U-S Everlasting Grand Opera Record 21133  (4-minute cylinder)

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VESS L. OSSMAN (banjo): St. Louis Tickle  

662 Sixth Avenue, New York; released c. January 1911
U-S Everlasting 318  (2-minute cylinder)

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FRED VAN EPS (banjo; piano by Albert Benzler): Gondolier / Temptation Rag 

662 Sixth Avenue, New York; released c. July 1911
U-S Everlasting 1260  (4-minute cylinder)

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CAL STEWART: Uncle Josh’s New Years Pledge

662 Sixth Avenue, New York; released late 1912
U-S Everlasting 1598 (4-minute cylinder)

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ARTHUR COLLINS & BYRON G. HARLAN: I’m Going Back to Dixie
[a.k.a. I Want to Be in Dixie] 

662 Sixth Avenue, New York; released c. April 1911
U-S Everlasting 453 (2-minute cylinder)

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BOB ROBERTS: Gee, But I Like Music with My Meals 

662 Sixth Avenue, New York; released Summer 1912
Lakeside 1498  (4-minute cylinder)

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BOB ROBERTS: My Own Adopted Child 

662 Sixth Avenue, New York; released c. January 1912
Lakeside 1385  (4-minute cylinder)

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The Playlist • Dallas String Band with Coley Jones (1927–1928)

MSP_col-14389D-147612.

DALLAS STRING BAND [with COLEY JONES]: Dallas Rag

Dallas: December 6, 1927
Columbia 14290-D (mx. W 145343 – 2)

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DALLAS STRING BAND [with COLEY JONES]: Sweet Mama Blues

Dallas: December 6, 1927
Columbia 14290-D (mx. W 145344 – 3)

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DALLAS STRING BAND with COLEY JONES: So Tired

Dallas: December 8, 1928
Columbia 14389-D (mx. W 147612 – 1)

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DALLAS STRING BAND with COLEY JONES: Hokum Blues

Dallas: December 8, 1928
Columbia 14389-D (mx. W 147613 – 1)

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The Playlist • Feodor Chaliapin in “Boris Godunov” (1910–1922)

MSP_chaliapin-boris_composi .

Chaliapin performs the roles of Boris, Pimen, and Varlaam, in the Rimsky-Korsokov  revision of Mussorgsky’s original work. Discographic data are from the Gramophone Company and Victor Talking Machine Company files, courtesy of Drs. Alan Kelly and John R. Bolig.

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FEODOR CHALIAPIN: Boris Godunov — Yet One More Tale [Pimen, Act I]

Moscow: August 31, 1910
His Master’s Voice 022157 (mx. 2016½c)
Orchestra of the Imperial Moscow Opera directed by I.Semenov

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FEODOR CHALIAPIN: Boris Godunov — In the Town of Kazan [Varlaam, Act I]

Camden, NJ: January 30, 1922
His Master’s Voice D.A. 100 (mx. B 26100 – 2)
Studio orchestra directed by Josef Pasternack

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FEODOR CHALIAPIN: Boris Godunov — Once at Eve [Pimen, Act IV]

St. Petersburg, Russia: November 26, 1911
His Master’s Voice 022252 (mx. 2548c)
No conductor listed in the Gramophone Company file

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FEODOR CHALIAPIN: Boris Godunov — Farewell and Death of Boris [Boris, Act IV]

St. Petersburg, Russia: October 15, 1911
His Master’s Voice 022221 / 022222 (mxs. 2492½c / 2493c)
No conductor listed in the Gramophone Company file

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The Photo Gallery • Popular Dance Band Leaders (1929–1930)

From 1930 (top two panels) and 1929 (bottom panel) issues of What’s on the Air. Harold “Scrappy” Lambert’s first name is mistakenly given as “Rodney” — not surprising, since more of his records probably were issued under pseudonyms than under his own name. The RCA–NBC connection is apparent in the appearance of Victor studio conductors Rosario Bourdon and Leonard Joy on the NBC page. Like some other house conductors of the period, they split their time between the recording and radio studios.

MSP_WOTT_bandleaders-1

The Playlist • Arturo Toscanini and Walter Damrosch — Acoustic Recordings (1921–1923)

MSP_col-68001D_98078.

NEW YORK SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (WALTER DAMROSCH, conductor):
Norwegian Dances, Nos. 1 and 2 (Grieg, op. 35)

New York: May 1, 1923
Columbia 65001-D (mx. 98078 – 1)

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“The La Scala Orchestra was made up of green Italian musicians and we found it very difficult to make them comprehend just what we wanted them to do for record making, and we, the Recording Staff, were not sorry when the engagement terminated… The sailing of the steamship on which they had booked passage, for some cause, was delayed or postponed on two different occasions, which prolonged the recording engagement, as the Victor Company thought it better to keep them engaged, fearing if they had open time they might sell their services to some other recording company.”
Victor recording engineer Harry O. Sooy (Memoirs, David Sarnoff Collection)

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LA SCALA ORCHESTRA (ARTURO TOSCANINI, conductor):
Carmen (Bizet) — Prelude to Act 4 (Aragonaise)

Church Studio (114 N. Fifth Street, Camden NJ): March 31, 1921
Victor 64999 (mx. B 24750 – 6)

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LA SCALA ORCHESTRA (ARTURO TOSCANINI, conductor):
L’ Arlésienne (Bizet) — Suite, No. 2 (Farandole)

Church Studio (114 N. Fifth Street, Camden NJ): March 11, 1921
Victor 64986 (mx. B 24984 – 1)

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For a history of early attempts at symphonic recording, see A Phonograph in Every Home and Recording the ‘Twenties, both available from Mainspring Press and many major libraries.

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