Collector’s Corner • More March 2020 Finds — Johnson’s Crackerjacks, Tiny Parham, Bennie Moten, Red Allen

Collector’s Corner
More March 2020 Finds — Johnson’s Crackerjacks, Tiny Parham,
Bennie Moten, Red Allen

 

A few more favorite new additions to the jazz collection, a little something to distract from the stay-at-home blues, we hope!

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HENRY (RED) ALLEN & HIS ORCHESTRA: Swing Out  (EE+)

New York: July 17, 1929
Victor V-38080  (mx. BVE 53930 – 2)

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TINY PARHAM & HIS MUSICIANS: Voodoo  (EE–)

Chicago: February 1, 1929
Victor V-38054  (mx. BVE 48844 – 2)

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TINY PARHAM & HIS MUSICIANS: Skag-a-Lag  (EE–)

Chicago: February 1, 1929
Victor V-38054  (mx. BVE 48845 – 2)

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BENNIE & BUSTER MOTEN (et al.): Loose Like a Goose  (EE+)

Chicago: July 18, 1929
Victor (Argentina) V-38123  (mx. BVE 55428 – 2)
c. 1930 Buenos Aires pressing, roughly contemporaneous with the U.S. release. Both the U.S. and Argentinian labels credit only Bennie and Buster Moten (pianos) by name, although clarinetist Woody Walder dominates the side.

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BENNIE MOTEN y SU ORQUESTA: Dentro de Poco (It Won’t Be Long)  (E)

Chicago: July 17, 1929
Victor (Argentina) V-38123  (mx. BVE 55427 – 3)
c. 1930 Buenos Aires pressing, roughly contemporaneous with the U.S. release.

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EDDIE JOHNSON’S CRACKERJACKS (Benny Jackson, vocal): The Duck’s Yas Yas  (E)

Atlanta (Egleston Auditorium): February 25, 1932
Bluebird B-6278  (mx. BVE 71625 – 1)
1936 original-stamper reissue of Victor 23329.
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Newest Free Download: The Victor Discography — Blue, Green, and Purple Labels by John R. Bolig (A $1,935.89 Book for Free)

Newest Free Download

The Victor Discography: Blue, Green, and Purple Labels
(1910 – 1926)
By John R. Bolig

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A couple of days ago, we posted that two Amazon.com dealers are offering this book for $1,935.89 (plus tax and shipping). Well, no need to whip out the Visa card — Here it is, complete and free of charge as a searchable PDF download, the latest addition to Mainspring Press’ Free Online Reference Library. Enjoy it on us!

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In February 1910, Victor flooded the market with fifteen new recordings by Harry Lauder, setting off a shouting match with Edison over who had exclusive rights to the comedian. Victor had previously issued some of Lauder’s British recordings on its standard black label, but these new releases were different — recorded in the U.S., and issued on a striking new royal-purple label.

Over the next few months, it became apparent that the new purple-label discs were not reserved for Lauder alone. Victor Herbert’s popular orchestra was lured away from an already-peeved Edison, and selections began to appear by some of Broadway’s top stars (many of them previously unrecorded). For budget-conscious classical enthusiasts, there were well-known concert artists deemed not quite worthy of Red Seal status, but still perfectly respectable. For the adventure-minded, Ernest Shackleton and Robert Peary recounted their polar expeditions.

Several months after the purples were launched, Victor introduced yet another line, the double-sided blue-label series. At first, it served only as a reissue vehicle for imported operatic recordings licensed from The Gramophone Company, along with some Arabic selections (now incredibly rare) recorded in Cairo and Beirut. But in February 1913, the blue label was recast as a double-sided companion to the single-sided purples, and the latter were slowly phased out.

The blue-label line was one of Victor’s most diverse, running the gamut from comedy monologues and Broadway hits to opera (grand, light, and in-between), classical (from the usual lollipops to complete extended works), the premier recording of Rhapsody in Blue, cantorials, exotic imports from around the globe, bird imitations, exercise records by boxer Gene Tunney — and, of course, copious helpings of Harry Lauder’s interminable ruminating.

The obscure green-label series was an “educational” line, best known for its vocal-instruction series produced under the supervision of Oscar Saenger. But perhaps its most intriguing offering was the “American Speech” series (issued at first on the Red Seal label, then transferred to green, and later to brown), which captured a wide range of American dialects, some of which have since vanished or evolved nearly beyond recognition.

It’s all here, carefully transcribed from the original Victor files. We think you’ll be amazed by the scope and diversity of these under-studied and often under-appreciated records.

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Download File for Personal Use (print-restricted) (pdf , ~2mb)
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The Victor Light Opera Company is the latest addition to Mainspring’s rapidly growing Free Online Reference Library. As with all titles in the Library, this is a copyrighted publication and is offered for personal, non-commercial use only. You can help ensure that we continue to offer these free titles (and protect yourself from potential legal problems) by honoring our terms of use, as outlined at the beginning of each file.

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Victor monthly supplement excerpts courtesy of John Bolig

Coming This Week — Get a $1,935.89 Book for Free!

No joke, sadly — This is a current listing on Amazon.com. (Actually, it’s  one of two listings for the same book, from two different vendors who just happened to have come up with exactly the same bizarre price; hmmm….)

Now, we’re not opposed to anyone making a fair profit, but unbridled greed is a different ballgame (not that we expect they’ll have any takers, even with a sucker being born every second). But since there’s no law against being a schmuck, we’re taking a more direct approach to the problem:

This coming week, thanks to John’s generosity, we’ll be posting a free PDF of the very same Victor Discography: Green. Blue, and Purple Labels (1910–1926) in its complete, original form. You’re welcome to download it, pass along the link to all your collector friends, and enjoy the heck out of of it, on us — knowing you’ve saved $1,935.89.

Check back in a few days, and cheers!

— Mainspring Press

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Latest Free Download • The Victor Light Opera Company Discography (John R. Bolig)

Latest Free Download

The Victor Light Opera Company Discography
(1909–1930)
By John R. Bolig
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Victor’s “Gems from…” discs were among the first records many of us encountered as budding young collectors. Like them or not,  they were still seemingly everywhere. Even now, you’re bound to run across them if you scrounge enough estate sales, junk shops, and !!RARE !!L@@K!! eBay listings.

They had been tremendous sellers, capitalizing on a popular American phenomenon of the day — grand opera sung in English by troupes of competent, if not-quite-stellar, artists. As the twentieth century began, countless small civic and private opera companies were making the glories of Verdi and Puccini accessible to the far-flung general public at affordable prices and in a language most could understand, just as the “Gems from…” series would do.

But Victor went a step farther, adding medleys from the latest hit Broadway shows that the average American was unlikely to be able to attend in person. In the process, the good folks at Victor  unwittingly preserved many now-forgotten songs (albeit it in abridged versions, and sometimes taken at break-neck tempos) that otherwise went unrecorded. The company had no qualms about using stage shots from the actual productions, picturing the actual stars (who almost never performed on the records), in advertising new “Gems” releases.

The Victor Light Opera Company was a fiction, of course. It never staged any live productions, and it never appeared in public. Its “cast” members — mainly Victor’s studio work-horses — changed from one recording session to another and (with one notable exception) were not credited on the labels. But their names are preserved in the Victor ledgers and, thanks to John Bolig’s expert sleuthing and generosity in sharing his work, are now available to you in this unique publication. Enjoy!

 

The Victor Light Opera Company is the latest addition to Mainspring’s rapidly growing Free Online Reference Library. As with all titles in the Library, this is a copyrighted publication and is offered for personal, non-commercial use only. You can help ensure that we continue to offer these free titles (and protect yourself from potential legal problems) by honoring our terms of use, as outlined at the beginning of each file.

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Download File for Personal Use (print-restricted) (pdf , ~1mb)

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Victor monthly supplement excerpts, courtesy of John Bolig

 

Collector’s Corner • Some March 2020 Finds: Theodore Shaw, Oliver Naylor, Duke Ellington, Bumble Bee Slim & Memphis Minnie, Louis Armstrong’s Hot Five without Louis

Collector’s Corner • Some March 2020 Finds
Theodore Shaw, Oliver Naylor, Duke Ellington,
Bumble Bee Slim & Memphis Minnie,
Louis Armstrong’s Hot Five sans Louis

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A few favorite new additions to the collection for March (so far), for your enjoyment in case you’re stuck at home and being driven up the wall by the endless coverage of Covid-19. (It has a real name, and it’s not “China Virus.” Anyone who thinks calling it “China Virus” is clever or appropriate is invited to go get their free music elsewhere. Enough with the childish shit, and with the sorry losers who perpetuate it.)

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THEODORE SHAW: Hold ’Er Newt (They’re After Us)
(V+)

Richmond, IN: April 17, 1924
Vaughan 825 (Gennett mx. 11831 – B)
Shown in error as mx. 11881 in Brian Rust’s Jazz Records (Sixth Edition). Shaw’s first name is not shown on the labels but is listed in the Gennett files. This was one of James D. Vaughan’s Ku Klux Klan records, with Shaw accompanying the Vaughan Quartet’s “Wake Up America and Kluck, Kluck, Kluck” on the reverse side.

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OLIVER NAYLOR’S SEVEN ACES: Ain’t That Hateful
(V++)

New York: February 22, 1924
Gennett 5393 (mx. 8748 – A)
“They have that distinctive New Orleans rhythm that can only be developed by living in the South…” — Gennett Record Gazette I:3 (see the full article at the end of this post)

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NEW ORLEANS WANDERERS: Perdido Street Blues
(EE–)

Chicago: July 13, 1926
Columbia 698-D (mx. W 142426 – 1)

The band is Louis Armstrong’s Hot Five, with George Mitchell subbing for Armstrong (who was exclusive to Okeh at the time and had recently been apprehended and chastised after he was caught recording  surreptitiously for Vocalion).

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DUKE ELLINGTON & HIS ORCHESTRA (as ­Joe Turner & his Memphis Men): Mississippi Moan  (E––)

New York: April 24, 1929
Columbia 1813-D (mx. W 148172 – 3)

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BUMBLE BEE SLIM & MEMPHIS MINNIE: New Orleans Stop Time  (E–)

Chicago: February 6, 1936
Vocalion 03197 (mx. C 1227 – 2)

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Latest Free Download • U-S Everlasting Cylinders – Complete Issues (New Revised Edition)

Latest Free Download

U-S EVERLASTING CYLINDERS:
Complete Issues

 

New Revised Edition by Allan Sutton
Data Compiled by William R. Bryant and
The Record Research Associates

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Introducing the latest edition of Mainspring Press’ 2011 U-S Everlasting cylinderography (now out of print), fully revised using data from William R. Bryant’s and the Record Research group’s extensive research collections (a part of the Mainspring Press archive). In addition to the complete popular/standard catalog, this edition covers the Foreign, Grand Opera, Medicophone, and Singaphone series.

U-S Everlasting Cylinders is the latest addition to Mainspring’s rapidly growing Free Online Reference Library. As with all titles in the Library, this is a copyrighted publication and is offered for personal, non-commercial use only. You can help ensure that we continue to offer these free titles (and protect yourself from potential legal problems) by honoring our terms of use, as outlined at the beginning of each file.

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Download File for Personal Use (print-restricted) (pdf , ~1mb)

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Suspending All Sales and Shipping Outside of USA

Mainspring Press has suspended all sales and shipping outside of the U.S. due to delays and stoppages in foreign postal and customs services. Unfortunately, we will have to cancel any order placed for foreign delivery until further notice.

U.S. customers may continue to order as usual, provided delivery is to a U.S. ZIP code. Please note that at this time, all titles except American Records Companies and Producers, 1888-1950 (of which only a few copies remain) have sold out and will not be restocked.

We’re exiting the book business after twenty successful years, but you can continue to enjoy Mainspring Press discographies thanks to our rapidly growing Online Reference Library. Titles are free to download for your personal use and include new editions of some favorite out-of-print publications, plus exciting new offerings.

Latest Free Download • Indestructible Cylinders, 1907–1921 (New Revised Edition)

Latest Free Download

INDESTRUCTIBLE CYLINDERS:
The Complete American and
British Issues, 1907–1921

 

New Revised Edition by Allan Sutton
Data Compiled by William R. Bryant and
The Record Research Associates

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Introducing the latest edition of Mainspring Press’ 2011 Indestructible cylinderography (now out of print), fully revised using data from William R. Bryant’s and the Record Research group’s extensive research collections (a part of the Mainspring Press archive).

Indestructible Cylinders is the latest addition to Mainspring’s rapidly growing Free Online Reference Library. As with all titles in the Library, this is a copyrighted publication and is offered for personal, non-commercial use only. You can help ensure that we continue to offer these free titles (and protect yourself from potential legal problems) by honoring our terms of use, as outlined at the beginning of each file.

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Download File for Personal Use (print-restricted) (.pdf, ~1mb)

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Good Listening • “The Missing Link: How Gus Haenschen Got Us from Joplin to Jazz and Shaped the Music Business” (Archeophone)

Good Listening:

The Missing Link: How Gus Haenschen Got Us from Joplin to Jazz and Shaped the Music Business
(Archeophone 6011)

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If you’ve been following Jim Drake’s Gus Haenschen interview series on the blog, here’s the accompanying soundtrack, on a newly released CD. Archeophone Records has compiled a superb sampling of recordings by Haenschen and some of the bands and singers he oversaw in the studio, along with some interesting related items.

The star attraction is a complete run of Haenschen’s 1916 Columbia Personal Records, including his Banjo Orchestra’s  impossibly rare “Maple Leaf Rag” — a wonderfully relaxed performance that stands in striking contrast to Vess Ossman’s break-neck rendition of a decade earlier. It’s interesting to compare this with recordings of the same piece by Brun Campbell, the only other confirmed Joplin pupil to have recorded it (Haenschen recalled paying Joplin “around $25 a month” for instruction). Unfortunately, the Personal Records were made at a time when Columbia’s recording and pressing quality were at their all-time worst, but Archeophone has done a remarkable job of  recovering what’s there while preserving the integrity of the original recordings.

The rest of the CD is devoted largely to jazz, pop vocal, and dance numbers of 1920–1924 by artists Haenschen recorded for Brunswick, ranging from some fine regional bands captured on their home turf, to the rather dreadful (but historically interesting) Charlie Chaplin–Abe Lyman collaboration. Brunswick’s acoustic recording technology was far superior to Victor’s or Columbia’s and comes through brilliantly through in these clean transfers. A nice bonus is an excerpt from Jim Drake’s 1975 interview with Haenschen and songwriter Irving Caesar.

Archeophone productions are notable for their accompanying booklets, and this one (at a generous thirty pages) is no exception, with an expertly researched and well-written biography and listening guide by Colin Hancock, a detailed discography, and many rare illustrations. For more details, visit Archeophone Records.

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On the Mainspring Press Blog:
James A. Drake: The Gus Haenschen Interviews

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Free Download • Ajax Records: The Complete Discography

Free Download
Ajax Records: The Complete Discography
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.William R. Bryant & The Record Research Associates
Edited and Annotated by Allan Sutton

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Download Free for Personal Use (pdf, ~0.5mb)

 

Ajax has been called “the forgotten race record label.” It was an odd creature, the product of Emile Berliner’s rebellious son Herbert, and his Canadian-based Compo Company; but the masters were recorded in New York (for the most part), and the records, although pressed in Canada, were intended for the African-American market in the U.S.

Although the “Ajax Record Company” was officially headquartered in Chicago, it was little more than a sales and distribution office, managed by Compo Company personnel. Unfortunately, Ajax never recorded there (the sides listed as Chicago recordings in some discographies were actually made in Montreal, as the surviving Compo ledgers confirm). Berliner instead brought locally available artists to his New York branch studio. Most of them were contracted by promoter and publisher Joe Davis (who oversaw the recording sessions along with Berliner), and few measured up to the Chicago-based artists that Paramount was promoting so successfully at the time. Nevertheless, there are some gems to be found in the Ajax catalog.

Although Compo’s files have survived, those of its Ajax subsidiary (which used a separate series of master numbers) have not. Therefore, this is a reconstruction, based in part on first-hand inspection of the now-rare original discs, and in part on what can be inferred from surviving documentation, including relevant portions of the Compo ledgers, and listing and release dates from The Chicago Defender, The Talking Machine World, and other period publications. Recording-date ranges have been extrapolated based upon  Berliner’s monthly week-or-so absences from Montreal (as noted in the ledgers), which are believed to correspond with his visits to the New York studio, and which correlate very nicely with the confirmed release dates. Personnel listings are based upon the recollections of Louis Hooper, Joe Davis, and others who were present at the recording sessions.

A detailed history of the Ajax Record Company, and of Herbert Berliner and the Compo Company’s American recording activities, can be found in American Record Companies and Producers: An Encyclopedic History, 1888–1950, available from Mainspring Press.

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See all titles in the Mainspring Press
Free Online Reference Library

Like all of our free downloadable titles, this publication is offered for your personal use only. Sale or other commercial use is prohibited, as is any unauthorized duplication, distribution, or alteration, including conversion to e-books or online databases.

Please honor our terms of use, so that we can continue to offer these free publications.

100 Years Ago at Okeh: Mamie Smith Gets Her Break

100 Years Ago at Okeh: Mamie Smith Gets Her Break
By Allan Sutton

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.In February 1920*, a vaudeville blues singer named Mamie Smith showed up at the General Phonograph Corporation’s Okeh studio, in the company of songwriter and publisher Perry Bradford, having been rejected by Victor a month earlier. Bradford was shopping around two of his new titles  — “That Thing Called Love” and “You Can’t Keep a Good Man Down.”

Bradford recalled that Fred Hager, General Phonograph’s musical director, was interested in both songs, especially if Sophie Tucker would agree to record them for Okeh. She wouldn’t, so Bradford took a chance and instead pitched Mamie Smith to Hager, recalling:

“[I] handed Mr. Hager this new line of jive: ‘There’s a colored girl, the one I told you about up in Harlem. Well, she will do more with these songs than a monkey can do with a peanut; she sings jazz songs with more soulful feeling than other girls, for it’s only natural with us…

“May God bless Mr. Hager, for despite many threats, it took a man with plenty of nerve and guts to buck those powerful groups and make the historical decision which echoed aroun’ the world. He pried open that old ‘prejudiced door’…

“After Mamie finished recording ‘That Thing Called Love’ and ‘You Can’t Keep a Good Man Down’ that snowy morning in February 1920, I was itching to jump and yell, right there in the studio, ‘Hallelujah, it’s done!’ It was a happy moment, for I’d schemed and used up all my bag of tricks to get that date.”

Okeh initially did nothing to promote Mamie’s record, nor did it need to. During the five months it took the company to finally release the disc, Bradford made sure that news of the session reached The Chicago Defender and other black-owned newspapers, and word-of-mouth did the rest. When Okeh 4113 finally appeared in July, it found an eager audience.

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Okeh initially did nothing to promote Mamie Smith’s first release. By the time this ad appeared in the autumn of 1920, her second release, “Crazy Blues,” was on its way to becoming a hit, and Okeh was promoting her aggressively.

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The record’s release was a symbolic victory, if not a musical one. Accompanied by Okeh’s plodding Rega Orchestra (“Rega” being a pseudonym for Hager, as confirmed in the federal copyright registers), Mamie played it straight. There is little to distinguish her performances on these sides from those of Marion Harris and some other white comediennes of the period, who in turn were trying to sound a little black-ish.

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MAMIE SMITH: That Thing Called Love

New York: Probably February 10 or 18, 1920*
Okeh 4113 (mx. S-7275 – E)
Accompanied by the Rega Orchestra (house group directed by Fred Hager); Charles Hibbard, recording engineer

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MAMIE SMITH: You Can’t Keep a Good Man Down

New York: Probably February 10 or 18, 1920*
Okeh 4113 (mx. S-7276 – D)
Accompanied by the Rega Orchestra (house group directed by Fred Hager); Charles Hibbard, recording engineer

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That would all change six months later, when Mamie Smith returned to Okeh and cut loose on Bradford’s “Harlem Blues” (renamed “Crazy Blues” for the occasion, a hastily made decision that would come back to bite Bradford, and badly; but that’s a story for another post). This time she was accompanied by the Jazz Hounds, a raucous little band that Bradford had thrown together for the session. They sorely taxed recording engineer Charles Hibbard’s patience, Bradford recalled, but produced what is generally acknowledged as the first true blues recording — or, perhaps more accurately, the first blues-like recording by a black woman. Whichever take you prefer, there’s no disputing that Mamie Smith’s records sparked the early-1920s blue craze and resultant birth of the race-record industry, which would provide opportunities for black performers that had been undreamed-of a decade earlier..

* When Was Mamie Smith’s First Session?

Okeh’s recording files for this period have long-since been destroyed, so we have to rely on circumstantial evidence — in this case, the weather reports. Discographies traditionally put the date at Saturday, February 14, with no source cited. But that’s almost certainly a bad guess, if Bradford’s recollection of a “snowy morning” is accurate. The weather in Manhattan on the 14th was fair and dry, as it had been (and would continue to be) for much of the month. It did snow there on Tuesday the 10th and Wednesday the 18th — either date being a far more likely candidate than the sunny-and-mild 14th.

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Quoted excerpts are from Perry Bradford’s autobiography, Born with the Blues (New York: Oak Publications, 1965).

110 Years Ago at Victor: Introducing the Fisk University Jubilee Quartet (Plus Photographs from Paul Laurence Dunbar’s “When Malindy Sings”)

110 Years Ago at Victor: Introducing the
Fisk University Jubilee Quartet

With Photographs from Paul Laurence Dunbar’s
When Malindy Sings

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Victor announces the first Fisk Jubilee Singers releases
(catalog courtesy of John Bolig)

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On February 19, 1910, the Victor Talking Machine Company released the first recordings by a quartet from the Fisk Jubilee Singers — a widely celebrated group that nevertheless had been ignored thus far by the recording companies. They were not the first black vocal group to record, by any means (see Tim Brooks’ Lost Sounds for more on that), but those groups had failed to gain traction in the record market, and their names were mostly dim memories by the time Victor released its first Fisk records.

Blues-and-gospel purists often dismiss these records as pandering to white audiences with “sanitized” or “Europeanized” treatment of traditional spirituals. But that was precisely the strategy — to present black music and performers in a concert setting, in a bid to attract white audiences who might otherwise have never considered attending a performance or purchasing a record by a black artist — and it succeeded wonderfully. Victor’s initial Fisk offerings were outstanding sellers and are still among the most commonly encountered records of the period. The Fisk singers, with periodic personnel changes, went on to make dozens of recordings for Victor, Edison, and Columbia from 1910 to early 1926.

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FISK UNIVERSITY JUBILEE QUARTET: I Couldn’t Hear Nobody Pray

Camden NJ: December 8, 1909
Victor 16448 (mx. B 8422 – 2)
Released February 10, 1909; Deleted 1923.

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For their other February 1910 Fisk release, Victor slipped into more typical “good-old-plantation-days” mode, having the group record Stephen Foster’s “Old Black Joe,” and backing it with J. A. Myers’ recitation of the Paul Laurence Dunbar poem, “When Malindy Sings.” Although Dunbar was African-American, and his work can be deeply moving at times, he employed stereotypical minstrel-show dialect that is almost unreadable, and difficult to stomach,  today. Myers’ recitation is an anomaly among the Fisk Jubilee Singers’ recorded output.

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From Paul Laurence Dunbar’s When Malindy Sings (New York: Dodd, Mead & Co., 1903). The book is notable for its photographs by members of the Hampton Institute Camera Club, headed by Leigh Richard Miner; names of the individual photographers unfortunately were not given. (Mainspring Press collection):

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Free Download • Columbia, Graphophone Grand, and Busy Bee Cylinders: Complete Catalog Listings (American Issues, 1896–1909)

Latest Free Download:
Columbia, Graphophone Grand, and Busy Bee Cylinders:
The Complete Catalog Listings
(American Series, 1896–1909)

 

Compiled by Allan Sutton
from the Original Catalogs and Advance Bulletins

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Download File for Personal Use (pdf, ~1mb)

 

This latest addition to the Mainspring Press Free Reference Library includes all confirmed American-series catalog listings (catalog numbers, titles, artists, and release dates) for cylinder records produced for retail sale by Columbia from 1896 to the end of its commercial cylinder production in 1909.

Note that this is not a fully detailed cylinderography, which would entail identifying the numerous remakes that Columbia produced over the years (on which different artists were sometimes substituted), changes in spoken announcements and accompaniments, and other details that are not readily available due to the destruction of Columbia’s cylinder files.

Credits are given only for the artists who performed on the initial releases. Thus, you may encounter specimens in your collection that don’t correspond to the artists listed here, particularly on brown-wax numbers that were remade in XP (black wax) format, and on XP-era numbers that were remade during the transition from piano to orchestral accompaniments.

If you do, I hope you will forward that information to Mainspring Press, which will keep it on file in anticipation of eventually producing a truly comprehensive Columbia cylinderography. A work of such scope and complexity will require the involvement of countless collectors and researchers, and is still many years in the future. However, the catalog listings given here should provide a solid foundation upon which to begin building that work.

 

Like all of our free downloadable titles, this publication is offered for your personal use only. Sale or other commercial use is prohibited, as is any unauthorized duplication, distribution, or alteration, including conversion to e-books or online databases.

Please honor our terms of use, so that we can continue to offer these free publications.

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Collector’s Corner (Free MP3 Downloads) • Some Early February Additions — Collins & Harlan, Van Eps Banjo Orchestra, Sammy Stewart’s Orchestra, Lottie Kimbrough, Hayes & Prater, Seven Gallon Jug Band

Collector’s Corner (Free MP3 Downloads) • Some Early February Additions
Collins & Harlan, Van Eps Banjo Orchestra, Sammy Stewart’s Orchestra, Lottie Kimbrough, Hayes & Prater, Seven Gallon Jug Band

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The past few weeks have seen a real hodge-podge come in, everything from the sublime to the ridiculous. Here are a few new favorite additions to the collection, for your enjoyment:

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ARTHUR COLLINS & BYRON G. HARLAN: Cohan’s Rag Babe  (E–)

New York: c. May 1908
Columbia A583 (mx. 3906 – 2)
With studio orchestra (probably Charles A. Prince, director)

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VAN EPS BANJO ORCHESTRA: Old Folks Rag  (E)

New York: September 25, 1914
Columbia A5618 (mx. 37042 – 2)
Fred Van Eps (banjo); others unlisted in the Columbia files.

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SAMMY STEWART & HIS ORCHESTRA: Copenhagen  (EE–)

Chicago: c. September 1924
Paramount 20359 (mx. 1891 – 1)

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LOTTIE KIMBROUGH (BEAMAN) (as LOTTIE EVERSON): Rolling Log Blues  (V++)

Richmond, IN: August 21, 1928
Champion 15636  (mx. GE 14162)
The Gennett matrix ledger states, “Use plain [take].” The guitarist is not identified.

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NAP HAYES & MATTHEW PRATER: Nothin’ Doin’  (V++)

Memphis: February 15, 1928
Okeh 45231 (mx. W 400243 – B)

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NAP HAYES & MATTHEW PRATER: Somethin’ Doin’  (V+)

Memphis: February 15, 1928
Okeh 45231 (mx. W 400241 – B)

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SEVEN GALLON JUG BAND: What If I Do  (E–)

New York: December 6, 1929
Columbia 2087-D (mx. W 149691 – 3)

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SEVEN GALLON JUG BAND: Wipe ’Em Off  (E–)

New York: January 3, 1930­
Columbia 2087-D (mx. W 149690 – 6)
No personnel listed in the Columbia files, other than Clarence Williams.

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