American Record Corporation / Brunswick Record Corporation Ephemera (1935 – 1937)

Many, many decades ago, CBS disposed of their remaining American Record Corporation and Brunswick Record Corporation marketing materials, some of which found their way into the hands of collectors. These were still fairly plentiful as late as the 1980s, but have since become increasingly scarce on the open market. Here are a few of the most interesting examples, all in “warehouse mint” condition (we have multiple copies of some items, in case anyone’s interested in trading for similar material).

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Shaped, die-cut display piece for Josh White’s “No More Ball and Chain” (1936)

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Circular die-cut folder for Duke Ellington’s “Reminiscing in Tempo.” The inside panels contain quotes from recent reviews, and the back lists Ellington’s current Brunswick releases. (1935)

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Race-record handouts for a couple of 1937 releases by Big Bill Broonzy. Identical handouts exist for the corresponding Romeo releases.

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1935 flyer for the Carter Family on Conqueror, a client label
produced for Sears by ARC.

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Window hanger for Billy Costello’s “Popeye” release (1935)

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Four-panel folder featuring selections from Fred Astaire’s
“Top Hat”  (1935)

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Jukebox display card for Louis Prima’s New Orleans Gang
(c. 1936)

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Gene Autry photo, with photo on the front and record list on the back. (1937)

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Hoosier Hot Shots handout, with photo on the front and record list on the back. Also exists in black-and-white. (1936)

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For a detailed history of ARC-BRC and associated companies, be sure to check out American Record Companies and Producers, 1888-1950 — a limited edition available from Mainspring Press while supplies last.

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The Playlist • The Famous Hokum Boys on Homestead (1929)

MSP_homestead-16098-copy2Some years ago, 78 Quarterly (an otherwise terrific magazine) ran an ongoing list of “The World’s Rarest Records,” which amounted to a few well-known collectors playing a game of “Mine’s bigger than yours.” Since 99.99% of the collecting community wasn’t polled on whether they owned any of the records in question, the rarity of some items was grossly over-estimated.

Case in point: Homestead 16098, which the 78Q gang assured readers was unknown on Homestead. Well, we’ve run across two copies over the years, one in Gettsyburg PA in the 1980s, and just recently, another one in Denver. Rare? Sure, in this form at least (the same recordings were also issued on the other ARC labels). World’s rarest? We wish! Anyway, enjoy…

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FAMOUS HOKUM BOYS: That’s the Way She Likes It

New York: April 9, 1930
Homestead 16098 (ARC mx. 9598 – 2)

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FAMOUS HOKUM BOYS: Papa’s Getting Hot

New York: April 9, 1930
Homestead 16098 (ARC mx. 9596 – 2)

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FAMOUS HOKUM BOYS: Eagle Riding Papa

New York: April 9, 1930
Homestead 16099 (ARC mx. 9595 – )
This selection from a tape dubbing supplied by the late Gilbert Louey (take # not noted)

The Famous Hokum Boys were Big Bill Broonzy (guitar/vocal), Thomas A. (“Georgia Tom”) Dorsey (piano/vocal), and Frank Brasswell (guitar). The studio supervisor for this session was Arthur Satherley.

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