The Playlist • Henry “Red” Allen (1929 – 1930)

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Before Victor snagged Louis Armstrong, their chief trumpet star was Henry Allen, Jr. (the “Red” business didn’t appear on labels consistently until later). His orchestra on Victor was actually that of Luis Russell, which was under contract to Okeh at the time. (This wasn’t Luis Russell’s only instance of rebranding. Many of King Oliver’s big-band sides were also by the Russell band, sometimes with only minimal participation by Oliver himself.)

Original shellac pressings of recordings like these are lovely to behold, we’ll grant you, and some can bring a king’s ransom if in truly outstanding shape (which most aren’t — and for all the newbies out there overpaying on eBay for wiped-out crap copies, keep in mind: it’s all about condition-condition-condition, even for the scarce stuff).

But for pure musical enjoyment, nothing beats a custom virgin-vinyl disc carefully hand-pressed from a well-preserved original stamper, like these (and since only a few copies were pressed, and were not sold to the public, they’re actually much rarer than the original shellacs). The vinyls used here were pressed in the 1950s or 1960s, most likely in conjunction with RCA’s “X-“ or “Vintage” LP reissue program. A lot of these custom pressings found their way to collectors in England; those used here, and many used elsewhere on the blog, eventually found their way back via the late Malcolm Shaw.

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HENRY ALLEN, JR. & HIS ORCHESTRA [Luis Russell’s Orchestra]: It Should Be You

New York (46th Street Studio): July 16, 1929
mx. BVE 55133 – 3 (commercially issued on Victor V-38073)

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HENRY ALLEN, JR. & HIS ORCHESTRA [Luis Russell’s Orchestra]: Swing Out

New York (studio unlisted): July 17, 1929
mx. BVE 53930 – 2 (commercially issued on Victor V-38080)

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HENRY ALLEN, JR. & HIS ORCHESTRA [Luis Russell’s Orchestra; vocal by Allen]: Roamin’

New York (24th Street Studio): July 15, 1930
mx. BVE 62345 – 2 (commercially issued on Victor 23006)

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HENRY ALLEN, JR. & HIS ORCHESTRA [Luis Russell’s Orchestra; vocal by Allen]: Patrol Wagon Blues

New York (24th Street Studio): July 15, 1930
mx. BVE 62343 – 2 (commercially issued on Victor 23006)

 

All from c. 1950s–1960s blank-labeled custom vinyl pressings from the original stampers. Discographical data from the original RCA files (Sony archives, NYC), courtesy of John Bolig.

 

 

 

The Playlist • Victor in the South — Hot Bands (1925 – 1928)

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FATTY MARTIN’S ORCHESTRA: End o’ Main

Houston: March 19, 1925
Victor mx. B 32111 – 2 (commercially unissued on 78)

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FATTY MARTIN’S ORCHESTRA: Jimtown Blues

Houston: March 19, 1925
Victor mx. B 32111 – 4 (commercially unissued on 78)

Above two titles from c. 1960s custom vinyl pressings of the original stampers. Takes 1 and 3, respectively, were issued on Victor 19700 (released 1925, deleted 1926).

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ROSS DE LUXE SYNCOPATORS (Margaret Miller, vocal): Skad-o-Lee

Savannah: August 22, 1927
Victor 20961 (mx. BVE 39823 – 2)
Released: December 16, 1927 – Deleted: 1929

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ROSS DE LUXE SYNCOPATORS (Frank Houston, vocal): Florida Rhythm

Savannah: August 22, 1927
Victor 20961 (mx. BVE 39827 – 2)
Released: December 16, 1927 – Deleted: 1929

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MEMPHIS RAMBLERS: Hold It Still

Memphis (Auditorium): February 4, 1928
Victor 21270 (mx. BVE 41841 – 2)
Released: April 20, 1928 – Deleted: 1931

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WILLIAMSON’S BEALE STREET FROLIC ORCHESTRA: Scandinavian Stomp

Memphis (McCall Building): February 27, 1927
Victor mx. BVE 37959 – 1 (commercially issued on Victor 21410)
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WILLIAMSON’S BEALE STREET FROLIC ORCHESTRA: Midnight Frolic Drag

Memphis (McCall Building): February 27, 1927
Victor mx. BVE 37960 – 2 (commercially issued on Victor 21410)

Above two titles from c. 1960s custom vinyl pressings of the original stampers. Victor 21410 was released July 20, 1928, deleted in 1930, and sold 4,819 copies according to the production-history card.

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Discographic data from the original Victor files, courtesy of John Bolig and the Discography of American Historical Recordings. Sales figures were entered on the Victor production-history cards at an unknown time by an unknown person, and are of questionable accuracy.

The Playlist • Frank Stokes and the Beale Street Sheiks (1927 – 1928)

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BEALE STREET SHEIKS (Frank Stokes & Dan Sane): Beale Town Bound

Chicago (Marsh Laboratories): c. August 1927
Paramount 12576 (mx. 4775 – 2)

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BEALE STREET SHEIKS (Frank Stokes & Dan Sane): Mr. Crump Don’t Like It

Chicago (Marsh Laboratories): c. September 1927
Paramount 12552 (mx. 20045 – 2)

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BEALE STREET SHEIKS (Frank Stokes & Dan Sane): Blues in “D”

Chicago (Marsh Laboratories): c. September 1927
Paramount 12552 (mx. 20048 – 2)

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FRANK STOKES: Downtown Blues

Memphis (Auditorium): February 1, 1928
Victor 21272 (mx. BVE 41822 – 1)
(Released: April 20, 1928; Deleted: 1931)

With uncredited second guitar. Take 2, also issued on 21272, is at a different tempo, uses some alternate lyrics, and does not include the reference to 1928.  Total sales, according to the Victor production files, were 13,449 copies — so not a particularly rare issue, as regional race records go, although there’s no way of telling for certain how scarce one take may be in relation to the other.

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Blues Fans — Be sure to check out these Mainspring Press titles, if you haven’t already. (We’re nearly sold out of “Paramount’s Rise and Fall,” and won’t be reprinting once the remaining copies are gone — order soon to avoid missing out!)

“Race Records” Nominated for 2017 ARSC Award

We’re pleased to announce that Race Records and the American Recording Industry, 1919–1945 (Allan Sutton, Mainspring Press) has been nominated for a 2017 Award for Excellence in Historical Recorded-Sound Research by the Association for Recorded Sound Collections. Winners will be announced later this year.

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MSP_race-records_cover
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Race Records
is available from Mainspring Press and many major libraries. Here’s a peek inside the book, at some of our favorite race-record ads:

msp_race-record-ads_1

 

 

Free Download: John Bolig’s Victor Black Label Discography, Vol. 5 (1935 – 1942)

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John Bolig’s many fans will be happy to hear that his new Victor Black Label Discography, Volume 5 is now available as a free download, courtesy of UC-Santa Barbara’s online Discography of American Historical Recordings (< click this link to get to the download site).

Volume 5 — the first in this important series for which there will be no printed edition — covers the 25000, 26000, and 27000 series, from 1935 to 1942. Like all previous volumes, it was compiled from the original RCA documentation and contains no speculative or anecdotal material — just the (non-alternative) facts.

The download is in searchable PDF format (Adobe Acrobat or Reader) and can be printed out for personal use. For book enthusiasts, Mainspring Press still has  copies of Volumes 1–4 available (which are not available as free downloads), but quantities are very limited, so order soon to avoid missing out — they’re sure to become collectors’ items.

The Playlist • What a Difference a Take Makes (Fats Waller & Thomas Morris / Charlie Johnson’s Paradise Band)

Victor retained many alternate backup takes in its early years, designating them “H” [hold], “H30” [hold 30 days] or “HC” [hold conditional] in the files. They’re generally of little interest for pop and classical recordings, but with jazz it’s another story. Here are two of our favorites for comparison, exhibiting striking differences in each performance, along with some subtle engineering variations. We’re extra lucky with the Johnson title, since Victor took the relatively uncommon step of designating two “holds.” Normally, one of the three would have been singled out for destruction [“D”].

The custom vinyl pressings of the unissued takes used here appear to have been made in the 1950s, probably in conjunction with RCA’s “X” reissue program. Apparently a fair number were pressed; they turn up with some frequency in private collections, including ours, and they occasionally still surface on high-end auction lists.

 

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THOMAS [FATS] WALLER WITH THOMAS MORRIS & HIS HOT BABIES: Red Hot Dan

Camden NJ (Church studio): December 1, 1927
Victor mx. BVE 40096 – 1 (“Hold” — Unissued on 78)
From a c. 1950s custom vinyl pressing of the original stamper

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THOMAS [FATS] WALLER WITH THOMAS MORRIS & HIS HOT BABIES: Red Hot Dan

Camden NJ (Church studio): December 1, 1927
Victor mx. BVE 40096 – 2 (“Master” — Issued on Victor 21127)

Other than Waller and Morris, no personnel are listed in the Victor files. Brian Rust’s guess that Victor studio manager Eddie King played drums is incorrect. King was no longer employed by Victor at the time of this session, having moved to Columbia as an assistant A&R manager in late October 1927.

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msp_johnson-c_paradise-orch

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CHARLIE JOHNSON & HIS PARADISE BAND: Walk That Thing

New York: September 19, 1928
Victor mx. BVE 47532 – 1 (“Hold” — Unissued on 78)

From a c. 1950s custom vinyl pressing of the original stamper

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CHARLIE JOHNSON & HIS PARADISE BAND: Walk That Thing

New York: September 19, 1928
Victor mx. BVE 47532 – 2 (“Master” — Issued on Victor 21712)

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CHARLIE JOHNSON & HIS PARADISE BAND: Walk That Thing

New York: September 19, 1928
Victor mx. BVE 47532 – 3 (“Hold” — Issued May 1939 on Bluebird B-10248)

Personnel listed in the Victor files appear to have been added at a later date by an unknown party, from an unknown source, probably in connection with the 1939 Bluebird release.

Discographical data from the Victor Talking Machine Company files, via John Bolig and the Discography of American Historical Recordings.

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The Playlist • The Chicagoans (1928–1929)

Some favorite sides featuring what early jazz writers termed “The Chicagoans,” a loosely affiliated group of young, white, mostly Midwestern jazz musicians who congregated in the city during the 1920s.

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CHICAGO RHYTHM KINGS (as “Jungle Kings”; Red McKenzie, uncredited vocal): Friars Point Shuffle

Chicago (Marsh Laboratories): c. Late March – Early April 1928
UHCA 3 (dub of Paramount 12654 [NYRL mx. 20563-2])

Given the scrambled accounts of this session in Eddie Condon’s autobiographical We Called It Music, and later in Brian Rust’s Jazz & Ragtime Records (6th Ed.), the date remains open to question. Rust erroneously stated that Condon said this session was held “on the day after the Chicago Rhythm Kings session for Brunswick.” But what Condon actually said was “The next day, he [Red McKenzie] went to Paramount and sold Lyons a date for us.” Compounding the problem is Condon himself, who got his two Brunswick-studio sessions out-of-order in his autobiography, confusing the first (on March 27, which produced only unissued masters allocated to Vocalion, including “Friars Point Shuffle”) with the second (on April 6). Although Condon stated that the Paramount date followed the session that produced “I’ve Found a New Baby,” his confusion over the Brunswick-studio sessions raises the question of which date the Paramount session actually followed.

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CHICAGO RHYTHM KINGS: I’ve Found a New Baby

Chicago: April 6, 1928
Brunswick 4001 (mx. C 1886 – A)

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RAY MILLER & HIS ORCHESTRA: That’s a Plenty

Chicago: January 3, 1929
Brunswick 4225 (mx. C 2743 – )
Three takes were recorded; the selected take is not indicated in the Brunswick files or on inspected pressings.

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ELMER SCHOEBEL & HIS FRIAR’S SOCIETY ORCHESTRA: Prince of Wails

Chicago: October 18, 1929
Brunswick 4653 (mx.  C 4560 – A)

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EDDIE [CONDON]’S HOT SHOTS (Jack Teagarden, vocal): That a Serious Thing

New York: February 8, 1929 (released May 17, 1929)
Victor V-38046 (mx. BVE 48346 – 2)

“Eddie Condon and his Orchestra” entered in Victor ledger, with “Eddie’s Hot Shots” assigned. This was a mixed-race session, with Leonard Davis (trumpet), Happy Caldwell (reeds), and George Stafford (percussion) present, which apparently was enough to land it in Victor’s predominantly black “Hot Dance” series.

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The Playlist • Memphis Jug Band (1927–1934)

MSP_vic-20809-a_MJB

 

MEMPHIS JUG BAND (Will Shade, vocal) : Sometimes I
Think I Love You

Victor Laboratory, Chicago: June 9, 1927
Released: September 16, 1927 — Deleted 1929
Victor 20809 (mx. BVE 38657 – 1)
Not designated as a race release in the Victor files.

 

MEMPHIS JUG BAND (Vol Stevens, vocal): Coal Oil Blues

Memphis Auditorium: February 13, 1928
Released: May 4, 1928 — Deleted: 1930
Victor 21278 (mx. BVE 41888 – 2)
Designated as a race release in the Victor files. From a tape transfer supplied by the late Mike Stewart.

 

MEMPHIS JUG BAND (as “Carolina Peanut Boys”; Charlie Nickerson, vocal): You Got Me Rollin’

Memphis Auditorium: November 28, 1930
Released: June 19, 1931 — Deletion date unlisted
Victor 23274 (mx.  BVE 64741 – 2)
The band’s identity is confirmed in the Victor ledger. From a tape transfer supplied by the late Mike Stewart.

 

MEMPHIS JUG BAND: Jazbo Stomp

Chicago: November 6, 1934
Mx. C 782 – 2 (commercially issued on Okeh 8955)
From a c. 1960s blank-labeled vinyl pressing from the original stamper

 

MEMPHIS JUG BAND (Will Shade and Charlie Burse, vocal):
Little Green Slippers

Chicago: November 7, 1934
Mx. C 784 – 1 (commercially issued on Okeh 8966/ Vocalion 03050)
From a c. 1960s blank-labeled vinyl pressing from the original stamper.

The Playlist • Tiny Parham & his Musicians (Chicago, 1929)

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TINY PARHAM & HIS MUSICIANS:  Fat Man Blues

Chicago: October 26, 1929 — Released: May 16, 1930
Victor V-38126 (mx. BVE 57335 – 2)

 

TINY PARHAM & HIS MUSICIANS:  Pig Feet and Slaw

Chicago: October 26, 1929 — Delayed Release: September 27, 1933
Victor 23410 (mx. BVE 57333 – 2)

 

TINY PARHAM & HIS MUSICIANS:  Steel String Blues

Chicago: October 26, 1929 — Delayed Release: September 27, 1933
Victor 23410 (mx. BVE 57337 – 3)

 

TINY PARHAM & HIS MUSICIANS:  Subway Sobs

Chicago: February 2, 1929 — Released: April 19, 1929
Victor V-38041 (mx. BVE 48849 – 1)

 

The original Victor files do not name band personnel for these selections (nor for most other jazz recordings of this period); the personnel listings in Jazz Records and other discographies are from uncited sources and should be considered speculative.

The Playlist • Harlem Bands on Victor, 1926–1930 — Savoy Bearcats, Fletcher Henderson, Lloyd Scott, Charlie Johnson, Red Allen

MSP_vic-20307B_savoy-bearcat

SAVOY BEARCATS: Bearcat Stomp

New York: August 23, 1926
Released: January 1927 — Deleted: 1928
Victor 20307 (mx. BVE 36060 – 3)
Don Redman’s last name is misspelled “Radman” on the labels and in the Victor files.

 

SAVOY BEARCATS: Stampede

New York: October 11, 1926
Released: April 8, 1927 — Deleted: 1929
Victor 20460 (mx. BVE 36030 – 7; remake of August 9, 1927)
The Victor files erroneously show three violins (but no reeds) present.

 

FLETCHER HENDERSON & HIS ORCHESTRA: Shufflin’ Sadie

New York: March 11, 1927
Victor mx. BVE 38160 – 1 (commercially unissued in 78-rpm form)
Leonard Joy, director, per Victor files (Joy was a Victor house conductor); Henderson not listed as being present, although a pianist is audible. From a c. 1960s custom vinyl pressing from the original stamper.

 

LLOYD SCOTT’S ORCHESTRA: Happy Hour Blues

New York: January 10, 1927
Released: May 13, 1927 — Deleted: 1929
Victor  20495 (mx. BVE 37531 – 2)
Ralph Peer, session supervisor, per Victor files.

 

CHARLIE JOHNSON & HIS PARADISE BAND: The Boy in the Boat

New York: September 19, 1928
Bluebird B-10248 (mx. BVE 47531 – 1)
Bluebird B-10248 (released May 1939) is the original form of issue for take 1; take 2 was issued in December 1928, on Victor 21712. Victor files list “The Rock” as alternate title.

 

JOE STEELE & HIS ORCHESTRA: Top and Bottom

New York: June 4, 1929
Victor mx. BVE 53809 – 2 (commercially unissued in 78-rpm form)
From a c. 1960s custom vinyl pressing from the original stamper. Take 1 was issued on Victor V-38066 on August 16, 1929.

 

HENRY ALLEN, JR. & HIS ORCHESTRA (Henry [Red] Allen, vocal): Patrol Wagon Blues

New York (24th Street studio): July 15, 1930
Released: October 24, 1930
Victor mx. BVE 62345 – 2 (issued on Victor 23006)
Loren L. Watson, session supervisor, per Victor files. From a c. 1960s custom vinyl pressing from the original stamper.

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The Playlist • Bobby / Bobbie Leecan, Robert Cooksey, and the South Street Trio (1927)

MSP_vic-21249B

 

BOBBY LEECAN’S NEED MORE BAND: Washboard Cut-Out

New York: April 5, 1927 (Ralph Peer, session director)
Released: August 12, 1927 — Deleted: 1929
Victor 20660 (mx. BVE 38434 – 1)
Personnel, aside from Victor A&R man Ralph Peer, are not listed in the recording file. “Bobbie” in file, “Bobby” on  labels.

 

BOBBY LEECAN’S NEED MORE BAND: Midnight Susie

New York: April 5, 1927 (Ralph Peer, session director)
Released: August 12, 1927 — Deleted: 1929
Victor 20660 (mx. BVE 38436 – 2)
As above.

 

SOUTH STREET TRIO: Dallas Blues

Camden, NJ: October 27, 1927
Released: February 3, 1928 — Deleted: 1930
Victor 21135 (mx. BVE 39377 – 2)
Personnel per Victor files: Robert Cooksey, harmonica; Bobby Leecan, banjo; Alfred Martin, guitar; uncredited vocalist.

 

SOUTH STREET TRIO: Mean Old Bed Bug Blues

Camden, NJ: October 27, 1927
Released: February 3, 1928 — Deleted: 1930
Victor 21135 (mx. BVE 39374 – 2)
Same personnel as above.

 

SOUTH STREET TRIO: Suitcase Breakdown

Camden, NJ: October 27, 1927
Released: February 3, 1928 — Deleted: 1930
Victor 21249 (mx. BVE 39376 – 2)
Same personnel as above, except no vocalist.

Discographical data are from the original Victor files, courtesy of John R. Bolig.

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The Playlist • Victor Tip-Toes Into the Race Record Market (1923)

Victor’s management remained aloof in the face of the blues craze until mid-1923, when they reluctantly decided to try a few blues-inflected titles by black singers. They made only a minimal effort, turning to publisher/talent-broker Joe Davis, who ran a booming business dispatching pre-packaged singers and accompanists, armed with his latest hits, to record-company executives who lacked the skills or desire to develop a race-record catalog on their own. Davis’ singers (some of whom had come to him from the defunct Black Swan operation) were a competent if undistinguished lot, able to make quick work of whatever was handed them for very little money.

In the group of recordings presented here, Rosa Henderson, Lena Wilson, Lizzie Miles, and their accompanists all came from Davis’ stable. They were local cabaret and vaudeville performers, and their work paled in comparison with the greats like Bessie Smith, Ida Cox, and Ma Rainey, who were beginning to appear on competing labels whose managers made the effort to scout truly great talent. But it was a start, at least, for what was then one of the most hidebound, complacent companies in the industry.

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MSP_vic_chi-def_8-4-1923

Victor’s first “blues” ad (Chicago Defender, August 4, 1923)

That summer, Victor took what was (for it) the unprecedented step of placing a large display ad in The Chicago Defender, the nation’s leading black newspaper, announcing their new “blues” records. Besides the first titles by Davis’ singers, there was a comedy skit by Moss & Frye; a couple of pop-ish duets by Sissle & Blake; and two generic-sounding fox trots by Arthur Gibbs & his Gang. Victor also dredged up their 1921 medley sides by the “Shuffle Along” pit orchestra for the list.

For the full story of Victor’s involvement in the race-record market, be sure to check out Race Records and the American Recording Industry, 1919–1945: An Illustrated History, the latest release from Mainspring Press.

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LIZZIE MILES (CLARENCE JOHNSON, piano): You’re Always Messin’ ‘Round with My Man

New York: May 23, 1923 — First advertised August 4, 1923
Victor 19083 (mx. B 28025 – 3)

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LENA WILSON (PORTER GRAINGER, piano): ‘T’ain’t Nobody’s Bizness If I Do

New York: May 9, 1923 — First advertised August 4, 1923
Victor 19085 (mx. B 27894 – 3)

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NOBLE SISSLE (EUBIE BLAKE, piano): Down-Hearted Blues

Camden, NJ: May 25, 1923 — First advertised August 4, 1923
Victor 19086  (mx. B 27976 – 3)

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LIZZIE MILES (Clarence Johnson, piano): Cotton Belt Blues

New York: July 19, 1923 — Released October 1923
Victor 19124 (mx. B 28298 – 4)

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ROSA HENDERSON (with uncredited band): Midnight Blues

New York: July 19, 1923 — Released October 1923
Victor 19124 (mx. B 28299 – 4)
The accompaniment is credited to Fletcher Henderson’s Orchestra in most discographies, with no source cited, although the aural evidence does suggest that at least some of Henderson’s men were present. The Victor files show only “Colored Orchestra – Edward T. King, director” (King was the Manager and Chief Petty Tyrant of Victor’s New York studio at the time).

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JAMES P. JOHNSON: Bleeding-Hearted Blues

Camden, NJ: July 25, 1923 — Released October 1923
Victor 19123 (mx. B 28197 – 6)

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Now In Stock: “Race Records and the American Recording Industry, 1919–1945: An Illustrated History”

IN STOCK — ORDER DIRECTLY FROM MAINSPRING PRESS

MSP_race-records_cover

RACE RECORDS AND THE AMERICAN RECORDING INDUSTRY, 1919–1945: An Illustrated History
By Allan Sutton

388 Pages / 208 Illustrations
6″ x 9″ Quality Paperback

$39 US (Free Shipping)
$59 All Foreign (w/ Insured Airmail)

_______________________________________

MSP-race-records_contents

 

From the Preface:

Race Records and the American Recording Industry is the story of those remarkable companies and individuals who gambled on a new and often unpredictable market in the face of racial prejudice and entrenched business practices, and in doing so made the American recording industry more inclusive, and far more interesting, than it once had been.

This work takes a broad view of what were once termed “race records” — recordings intended primarily for the African-American market, which often were segregated in specially numbered series and not listed in the record companies’ main catalogs. Many modern writers associate race records solely with blues and gospel, the equivalent of assuming that rural whites bought only records of mountaineer tunes, or that Italian immigrants bought only opera. While blues and gospel made up a large portion of race-record offerings, they were only part of a broad spectrum that also included religious material of all sorts, jazz and dance music, mainstream pop, comedy and novelty selections, concert and classical material, and even the occasional country-music offering, all of which are explored in this work

Because the music itself has been amply covered elsewhere, this work instead focuses on the making, marketing, and distribution of race records prior to the late 1940s, exploring the ways in which those activities affected, and were affected by, conditions within the nation and within the recording industry as a whole. That is why (to respond in advance to inevitable criticism by Robert Johnson’s legions of fans) an entire chapter is devoted to Mamie Smith, whereas Johnson is covered in several pages. Were this a musical rather than a business and social history, the ratio, of course, would be reversed.

But Mamie Smith’s early records, whatever their musical shortcomings, had a profound impact on the recording industry, revealing a huge untapped market, opening the way for many other black artists to make records, and encouraging aspiring black entrepreneurs to get involved with record production, which until then had been completely controlled by whites. On the other hand, although Robert Johnson is now revered by mass-media rock stars and the pop-culture establishment (as much for the hoary legends surrounding him as for his music), in the 1930s he was just another talented but obscure local artist whose records went largely unnoticed outside of his home region, and who had no significant impact on the recording industry or American musical culture at the time his records were issued. Johnson receives as much coverage as he does mainly  because his story provides an excellent example of how the record companies handled, or mishandled, their race artists.

The book also debunks many common myths and misconceptions that stubbornly refuse to die, having been perpetuated for decades by writers who are content to parrot anecdotal material from questionable secondary sources. Some long-standing discographical errors have been corrected as well, based upon examination of primary-source materials that have been missed by earlier researchers…

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The Playlist • Earl Hines & his Orchestra (Chicago, 1929)

MSP_vic_V-38096-A

 

EARL HINES & HIS ORCHESTRA: Grand Piano Blues

Chicago: October 25, 1929 — Released December 20, 1929
Victor V-38096 (mx. BVE 57322 – 2)
The common Bluebird reissue of this recording used an anemic-sounding dubbed master; here’s “Grand Piano” as originally issued, before RCA’s engineers wrung the life out of it (albeit a bit noisy, having spent many years in a Nebraska barn before being recently rescued).

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EARL HINES & HIS ORCHESTRA: Chicago Rhythm

Chicago: February 22, 1929 — Released April 19, 1929
Victor V-38042 (mx. BVE 50511 – 2)

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EARL HINES & HIS ORCHESTRA: Beau-Koo Jack

Chicago: February 15, 1929
Victor unissued take (mx. BVE 48887 -1)
From a c. 1960s custom vinyl pressing from the original stamper. Take 2 was issued on Victor V-38043 (released April 19, 1929)

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Discographic data are from the original RCA files, courtesy of John R. Bolig. Details of all of the Victor V-38000, V-38500, and other Victor race records are available in John’s mammoth Victor Black Label Discography, Vol. 4, available from Mainspring Press.

 

The Playlist • Jimmie Lunceford & the Chickasaw Syncopators (1927 / 1930)

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The evolution of a band, from two 1927 sides by a group that Manassas [Tennessee] High School instructor Jimmie Lunceford cobbled together from his students, to its blossoming under his leadership in the early 1930s. Moses Allen was one of only two or possibly three original members still present on the 1930 sides. Interesting to hear how his  “preaching” routine, originally offered up as a novelty bit on “Chickasaw Stomp,” evolved into the very different “In Dat Mornin’.”

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CHICKASAW SYNCOPATORS: Memphis Rag

Memphis: December 13, 1927
Regional release March 1928
Columbia 14301-D (mx. W 145374 – 3)

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CHICKASAW SYNCOPATORS (preaching by Moses Allen): Chickasaw Stomp

Memphis: December 13, 1927
Regional release March 1928
Columbia 14301-D (mx. W 145373 – 2)

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JIMMIE LUNCEFORD & HIS CHICKASAW SYNCOPATORS
(preaching by Moses Allen): In Dat Mornin’

Memphis Auditorium: June 6, 1930
Released August 15, 1930
Victor V-38141 (mx. BVE 62599 – 2)

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JIMMIE LUNCEFORD & HIS CHICKASAW SYNCOPATORS: Sweet Rhythm

Memphis Auditorium: June 6, 1930
Released August 15, 1930
Victor V-38141 (mx. BVE 62600 – 1)