Clarence Williams: Newspaper Highlights (1922 – 1965)

Clarence Williams: Newspaper Highlights (1922 – 1965)

.

Advertisement for Clarence Williams’ first record, on the C&S label (1922). The C&S Phonograph Record Company was a short-lived venture of Thomas Chappelle and Juanita Stinnette Chappelle, who encouraged Williams to marry singer Eva Taylor.

.

With Sara Martin, one of Okeh’s early race-series stars
(June 1923)

.

With wife Eva Taylor (July 1923)

.

“Papa De-Da-Da” was among the Blue Five sides featuring
Louis Armstrong. (July 1925)

.

A vocal release by Williams and Clarence Todd, here misspelled “Dood.” Todd, along with Eva Taylor, was a member of the Clarence Williams Trio, which broadcast regularly for several years. (July 1925)

.

Williams was Okeh’s New York studio workhorse in the mid-1920s. Here, his Blue Five accompany a young Sippie Wallace. (August 1925)

.

New York (June 1926)

.

Williams’ ill-fated Bottomland opened on June 27, 1927, and closed after only nineteen performances.

.

New York Age (January 3, 1953). Member of the Clarence Williams Trio pictured above are (left to right) are Williams, Eva Taylor, and Clarence Todd.

.

.

Working the New York clubs (1951 and 1955)

.

.     New York (November 9, 1965)

_______________

And a sampling from Williams’ tremendous recorded output:

 

CLARENCE WILLIAMS’ ORCHESTRA: Jingles

New York: October 1927
Paramount 12587 (mx. 2882 – 2)
Featuring Coleman Hawkins, on loan from Fletcher Henderson’s Orchestra

.

CLARENCE WILLIAMS & HIS BOTTOMLAND ORCHESTRA:
Slow River (export version)

New York: June 7, 1927
Brunswick (German) A-457 (mx. E 23502)
The standard version (mx. E 23500) includes vocal chorus by Evelyn Thompson (Preer).

.

CLARENCE WILLIAMS’ WASHBOARD FIVE (Williams, vocal):
Walk That Broad

New York: September 26, 1928
Okeh 8629 (mx. W 40115 – A)

.

CLARENCE WILLIAMS’ JAZZ KINGS: The Keyboard Express

New York: August 1, 1928
Columbia 14348-D (mx. W 146825 – 3)

.

CLARENCE WILLIAMS & HIS ORCHESTRA (as Memphis Jazzers): Close Fit Blues

New York: March 1929
Van Dyke 7801 (Grey Gull mx. 3394 – B)

Forgotten “Blues Craze” Singers • Esther Bigeou

Forgotten “Blues Craze” Singers • Esther Bigeou
By Allan Sutton

 

The success of Mamie Smith’s “Crazy Blues” in 1920 set off a mad scramble among record companies for similar artists. Many of the women who were signed in the early days of the “blues craze” — like Esther Bigeou — were not blues singers at all, but vaudeville comediennes who specialized in blues-inflected pop tunes.

From a prominent New Orleans Creole family, Bigeou married theatrical producer Irvin C. Miller and was soon landing featured roles in his stage productions. She first attracted the critics’ attention in 1915, in Miller’s Mr. Ragtime.

.

Miller and unidentified female cast members, one them presumably Esther Bigeou, from Mr. Ragtime (September 1915)

.

Praise for Bigeou in The New York Age (September 9, 1915)

.

Bigeou went on to star in Miller’s Broadway Rastus, which opened at the Lafayette Theatre in Harlem in July 1917, after a try-out on the road that took the company throughout the mid-Atlantic states.

.

An overworked Esther Bigeou takes a break (August 1917)

.

Suffering from “a variety of ailments due to overwork,” Bigeou took a break for several weeks after Broadway Rastus closed its brief run at the Lafayette. The company was soon on the road again, embarking on a year-long tour during which audiences and critics alike heaped praises on Bigeou.

.

Broadway Rastus on the road: Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
(September 1918)

.

By early 1920, Bigeou had parted ways with Miller and was touring in Perrin & Henderson’s Lyric Road Show, an obscure revue that also starred “Mlle.” Rosa Henderson, who would become one of the most prolific of the “blues craze” recording artists. Miller’s Put and Take opened at the Town Hall, New York, on August 23, 1921. The female featured role, which might have gone to Bigeou, instead was given to Edith Wilson. Miller went on to marry Kathryn Boyd, who was given a position as Miller’s road manager that she found to be “a little too strenuous.”

The Okeh label signed Bigeou in the autumn of 1921. Her first release, a coupling of the already over-used “Memphis Blues” and “St. Louis Blues” (Okeh 8026) appeared in the Christmas 1921 list but seems to have attracted little attention. “Stingaree Blues,” her November follow-up (Okeh 8025), seems to have sold reasonably well based on the number of surviving copies, despite its plodding accompaniment.

.

Many of Bigeou’s Okeh releases were covers of other artists’ hits on competing labels — in this case, Bessie Smith’s popular Columbia recording of “Gulf Coast Blues.”

.

Although Okeh did not renew Bigeou at the end of 1923, she continued to promote her records for a time (Pittsburgh, February 1924)

.

Overall, Bigeou’s Okeh output will disappoint hard-core blues enthusiasts. The performances are purely in the vaudeville-blues vein, with accompaniments ranging from mediocre to awful, and many are simply cover versions of other singers’ hits on competing labels. Okeh released seventeen Bigeou titles before letting her go at the end of 1923. Only her last is of above-average interest, with a rollicking accompaniment by the Piron orchestra that imparts a Creole flavor not evident on her other recordings:

.

.
ESTHER BIGEOU with ARMAND J. PIRON’S NEW ORLEANS ORCHESTRA: West Indies Blues

New York: December 1923
Okeh 8118 (mx. S-72175 – B)

.

Okeh recorded Bigeou again in December 1926, accompanied by Clarence Williams’ Blue Five, but no issues resulted. By then, Bigeou was touring with her own company on the T.O.B.A. vaudeville circuit. In late 1927, she joined the cast of Southland Follies. But perhaps her most visible role was as a celebrity endorser of  Hi-Ja beauty products, in whose ads she appeared from 1925 through 1929.

.

1925

.

1929

 

______________

© 2019 by Allan R. Sutton. All rights are resered.

    .

Collector’s Corner – Some September Finds • Billy Murray & Friends, The Plantation Orchestra, Clarence Williams’ Washboard Five, Louis Armstrong’s Savoy Ballroom Five, Bill Cox

Collector’s Corner (September 2018) • Billy Murray and Friends, The Plantation Orchestra, Clarence Williams’ Washboard Five, Louis Armstrong’s Savoy Ballroom Five, Bill Cox

.

 

September was a real mixed bag collecting-wise, everything from pioneer stuff to some 1920s jazz classics to a big stack of early 1930s Champions (plus a slew of nice cylinders that are still being gone through for a future posting). Here are a few favorites from the September additions:

.

 

BILLY MURRAY:
Eskimo Rag
  (EE-)

Camden, NJ: June 17, 1912
Victor 17166 (mx. B 12112 – 2)
Released November 1912; Deleted November 1914

.

ELSIE BAKER (as EDNA BROWN) & AMERICAN QUARTET:
Mysterious Moon  (E-)

Camden, NJ: June 18, 1912
Victor 17166 (mx. B 12114 – 2)
Released November 1912; Deleted November 1914

Elsie Baker is identified in the Victor files, as is the American Quartet (Billy Murray, lead tenor and speech), who are not credited in the labels.

.

THE PLANTATION ORCHESTRA:
Smiling Joe
 
(V++)

London: December 1, 1926
Columbia (British) 4185  (mx. A 4544 -1)

This was the pit orchestra from the Blackbirds Revue, an American production featuring Florence Mills that played the London Pavilion in 1926.

.

CLARENCE WILLIAMS’ WASHBOARD FIVE (Williams, vocal):
Have You Ever Felt That Way?
(E-)

New York: September 26, 1928
Okeh 8629 (mx. W 401153 – A)

.

CLARENCE WILLIAMS’ WASHBOARD FIVE (Williams, vocal):
Walk That Broad
(E-)

New York: September 26, 1928
Okeh 8629 (mx. W 401152 – A)

.

LOUIS ARMSTRONG & HIS SAVOY BALLROOM FIVE:
Mahogany Hall Stomp (EE-)

New York: March 5, 1929
Okeh 8680 (mx. W 401691 – B)

.

BILL COX (as LUKE BALDWIN):
My Rough and Rowdy Ways
(E-)

Richmond, IN: April 28, 1930
Champion 16009 (mx. GE 16544)

__________

Going to Press in October:

The Louisville Jug Band Gets Arrested (1914), and Other Earl McDonald Snippets

The earliest known personnel listing for the Louisville Jug Band, 1914. “Colvin” presumably is a typo for Ben Calvin, who worked on-and-off with McDonald for many years; could “John Smith” be a typo for Cal Smith, a long-time McDonald associate? (Louisville Courier-Journal, October 20, 1914)

.

A 1918 iteration of the Louisville Jug Band, interrupting their Chicago engagement for a week’s appearance at the Antler cabaret in Dayton, Ohio. Can anyone identify the members? (Dayton Daily News, April 14, 1918)

.

McDonald and company fared far better than most race-record artists during the early Depression years, thanks to their popular “Ballard Chefs” broadcasts. Originating in Louisville, the program aired in many major cities. (What’s on the Air, April 1930)

.

Earl McDonald entertains at the University Kentucky. (Louisville Courier-Journal, February 15, 1948)

.

(Louisville Courier-Journal, April 29, 1949)

.

SARA MARTIN & HER JUG BAND: I’m Gonna Be a Lovin’ Old Soul

New York: September 1924
Okeh 8211 (mx. S 72837-b)

Clifford Hayes, violin; Curtis Hayes, banjo; Earl McDonald, jug

 

“Race Records” Nominated for 2017 ARSC Award

We’re pleased to announce that Race Records and the American Recording Industry, 1919–1945 (Allan Sutton, Mainspring Press) has been nominated for a 2017 Award for Excellence in Historical Recorded-Sound Research by the Association for Recorded Sound Collections. Winners will be announced later this year.

.

MSP_race-records_cover
.
Race Records
is available from Mainspring Press and many major libraries. Here’s a peek inside the book, at some of our favorite race-record ads:

msp_race-record-ads_1

 

 

The Playlist • Okeh Race Record Favorites (1921 – 1928)

race-records_okeh_comp1

Seven of our race-record favorites, from the company that broke the mold and started it all — Check out the full story in Race Records and the American Recording Industry, 1919–1945, available from Mainspring Press.

.

MAMIE SMITH & HER JAZZ HOUNDS: Jazzbo Ball

New York: February 1921
Okeh 4295 (mx. S 7788 – B)
The February 21 recording date shown in some discographies is speculative and not from the Okeh recording files (which do not exist for this period).

.

KING OLIVER’S JAZZ BAND: Dipper Mouth Blues

Chicago (Consolidated Talking Machine Co. offices): June 23, 1923
Okeh 4918 (mx. 8402 – A)

.

BENNIE MOTEN’S KANSAS CITY ORCHESTRA: 18th Street Strut

Kansas City, MO: May 1925
Okeh 8242 (mx. 9123 – A)

The May 14 recording date shown in some discographies is speculative and not from the Okeh recording files (which do not exist for this Kansas City series).

.

CLIFFORD [HAYES]’ LOUISVILLE JUG BAND: Struttin’ the Blues

Chicago: May 1925
Okeh 8238 (mx. 9143 – A)

The May 20 recording date shown in some discographies is speculative and not from the Okeh recording files (which do not exist for this session), but probably is fairly accurate, as the preceding session (consisting of Polish vocals) is dated May 19 in the Okeh files.

.

WHISTLER [BRUFORD THRELKELD] & HIS JUG BAND: Pig Meat Blues

St. Louis: April 30, 1927
Okeh 8816 (mx. W 80799 – )
From a tape dubbing supplied by the late Mike Stewart.

.

NAP HAYES & MATTHEW PRATER: Nothin’ Doin’

Memphis: February 15, 1928
Okeh 45231 (mx. W 400243 – B)
Issued in the white country-music series, although Hayes and Prater were African American. Lonnie Johnson performed with them on the first four titles from this eight-title session.

.

JESSE STONE & HIS BLUE SERENADERS: Starvation Blues

St. Louis: April 27, 1927
Okeh 8471 (mx. W 80761 – C)

.

ARIZONA DRANES (vocal and piano): I Shall Wear a Crown

Chicago: July 3, 1928
Okeh 8600 (mx. W 400980 – )
From a tape dubbing supplied by the late Mike Stewart. The accompanying vocalists and mandolin player are unidentified on the labels and in the Okeh files.

.

msp_king-oliver-ad

.

msp_oliver_ok-ad1

The Playlist • “Yellow Dog Blues,” Four Very Different Ways (1919–1934)

MSP_smith-columbia-14075-D

.

JOSEPH C. SMITH’S ORCHESTRA, Featuring HARRY RADERMAN & HIS LAUGHING TROMBONE: Yellow Dog Blues — Medley Fox Trot, introducing “Hooking Cow Blues”

New York: October 1, 1919 — Released December 1919 (Deleted 1926)
Victor 18618 (mx. B 23282 – 1)

.

BESSIE SMITH (acc: Fletcher Henderson’s Hot Six):
Yellow Dog Blues

New York: May 6, 1925
Columbia 14075-D (mx. W 140586 – 1)

.

DUKE ELLINGTON & HIS ORCHESTRA: Yellow Dog Blues

New York: June 25, 1928
Brunswick 3987 (mx. E 27771 – A or B)
The selected take (of two made) is not indicated in the Brunswick files or on inspected pressings.

.

MEMPHIS JUG BAND: Rukus Juice and Chittlin’

Chicago: November 8, 1934
Okeh mx. C 801 – 1
From a c. 1960s vinyl pressing from the original stamper. This recording was issued commercially on Okeh 8955, as part of the final group of Okeh race releases made before the 8000 series was scuttled.

.

The Playlist • St. Louis Jazz: Jesse Stone and Dewey Jackson Rarities (1926–1927)

MSP_OK-8471_VOC-1040-.

JESSE STONE & HIS BLUE SERENADERS: Starvation Blues

St. Louis: April 27, 1927
Okeh 8471 (mx. W 80761 – C)

.

JESSE STONE & HIS BLUE SERENADERS: Boot to Boot

St. Louis: April 27, 1927
Okeh 8471 (mx. W 80763 – A)

.

DEWEY JACKSON’S PEACOCK ORCHESTRA: Capitol Blues

St. Louis: June 1926
Vocalion 1040 (mx. E 3417, renumbered from test TC 1007)

.

DEWEY JACKSON’S PEACOCK ORCHESTRA: She’s Crying for Me

St. Louis: June 1926
Vocalion 1040 (mx. E 3415, renumbered from test TC 999)