Collector’s Corner (Free MP3 Downloads) • Some Early February Additions — Collins & Harlan, Van Eps Banjo Orchestra, Sammy Stewart’s Orchestra, Lottie Kimbrough, Hayes & Prater, Seven Gallon Jug Band

Collector’s Corner (Free MP3 Downloads) • Some Early February Additions
Collins & Harlan, Van Eps Banjo Orchestra, Sammy Stewart’s Orchestra, Lottie Kimbrough, Hayes & Prater, Seven Gallon Jug Band

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The past few weeks have seen a real hodge-podge come in, everything from the sublime to the ridiculous. Here are a few new favorite additions to the collection, for your enjoyment:

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ARTHUR COLLINS & BYRON G. HARLAN: Cohan’s Rag Babe  (E–)

New York: c. May 1908
Columbia A583 (mx. 3906 – 2)
With studio orchestra (probably Charles A. Prince, director)

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VAN EPS BANJO ORCHESTRA: Old Folks Rag  (E)

New York: September 25, 1914
Columbia A5618 (mx. 37042 – 2)
Fred Van Eps (banjo); others unlisted in the Columbia files.

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SAMMY STEWART & HIS ORCHESTRA: Copenhagen  (EE–)

Chicago: c. September 1924
Paramount 20359 (mx. 1891 – 1)

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LOTTIE KIMBROUGH (BEAMAN) (as LOTTIE EVERSON): Rolling Log Blues  (V++)

Richmond, IN: August 21, 1928
Champion 15636  (mx. GE 14162)
The Gennett matrix ledger states, “Use plain [take].” The guitarist is not identified.

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NAP HAYES & MATTHEW PRATER: Nothin’ Doin’  (V++)

Memphis: February 15, 1928
Okeh 45231 (mx. W 400243 – B)

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NAP HAYES & MATTHEW PRATER: Somethin’ Doin’  (V+)

Memphis: February 15, 1928
Okeh 45231 (mx. W 400241 – B)

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SEVEN GALLON JUG BAND: What If I Do  (E–)

New York: December 6, 1929
Columbia 2087-D (mx. W 149691 – 3)

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SEVEN GALLON JUG BAND: Wipe ’Em Off  (E–)

New York: January 3, 1930­
Columbia 2087-D (mx. W 149690 – 6)
No personnel listed in the Columbia files, other than Clarence Williams.

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Collector’s Corner (Free MP3s) • Some More January Jazz Additions — King Oliver, Clarence Williams, Chicago Rhythm Kings

Collector’s Corner (Free MP3s) • Some More January Jazz Additions — King Oliver, Clarence Williams, Chicago Rhythm Kings

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January’s been been a very good month indeed, record-wise. Much more fun collecting them than writing about them! So, here are a few more new additions to the jazz collection, for your listening pleasure.

You can find approximate personnel listings in our free download of Brian Rust’s Jazz Records, 6th Edition. They’re not from the original recording files (which rarely list full personnel before the late 1930s), and Brian didn’t cite his sources, but he’s probably pretty much on the mark for these sides.

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KING OLIVER & HIS DIXIE SYNCOPATORS (as Savannah Syncopators): Wa Wa Wa (EE+)

Chicago: May 29, 1926
Brunswick 3373 (Vocalion mx. E 30181)
Originally allocated mx. C 372. This pressing shows the assigned Vocalion mx. number. A Brunswick mx. number (E 20637), assigned on November 4, 1926, appears on later pressings.

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KING OLIVER & HIS DIXIE SYNCOPATORS (as Savannah Syncopators): Deep Henderson (E– to V++)

Chicago: April 21, 1926
Brunswick 3245 (Vocalion mx. E 2892)
Originally allocated mx. C 196. This pressing shows the assigned Vocalion mx. number. A Brunswick mx. number (E19679), assigned on July 3, 1926, appears on later pressings.

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CLARENCE WILLIAMS’ JAZZ KINGS: The Keyboard Express (EE–)

New York: August 1, 1928
Columbia 14348-D (mx. W 146825 – 3)

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CLARENCE WILLIAMS’ JAZZ KINGS (Williams, speech and vocal): Walk That Broad (E)

New York: August 1, 1928
Columbia 14348-D (mx. W 146826 – 3)

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CHICAGO RHYTHM KINGS: I’ve Found a New Baby (E–)

Chicago: April 6, 1928
Brunswick 4001 (mx. C 1886 – A)

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CHICAGO RHYTHM KINGS (Red McKenzie, vocal):
There’ll Be Some Changes Made
(EE–)

Chicago: April 6, 1928
Brunswick 4001 (mx. C 1885 – A)
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Collector’s Corner (Free MP3s) • Some New Year’s Additions — Martha Copeland, Black Boy Shine, Blind Boy Fuller, Earl Hines, Joe Gumin, Manolo Castro

Collector’s Corner (Free MP3s) • Some New Year’s Additions — Martha Copeland, Black Boy Shine, Blind Boy Fuller, Earl Hines, Joe Gumin, Manolo Castro

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Some of the first additions to the collection for 2020 — Enjoy!

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MARTHA COPELAND (Eddie Heywood, piano): Daddy, You’ve Done Put That Thing on Me (V++)

New York: c. September 1923 (Released December 1923)
Okeh 8091 (mx. S 71844 – C)

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EARL HINES: 57 Varieties (EE–)

Chicago: December 12, 1928
Columbia 2800-D (mx. W 402220 – A)
1933 Royal Blue re-pressing; originally released in 1929 on Okeh 8653  / 41175

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JOE GUMIN & HIS ORCHESTRA: I’ll Think of You (E+)

Chicago: October 30, 1931
Columbia 2571-D (mx. W 151869 – 2)

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HAVANA YACHT CLUB ORCHESTRA (Manolo Castro, conductor):
St. Louis Blues Rumba
(E– to V++)

New York (Victor Studio 1): July 10, 1931
Disque Gramophone (French) K-6524 (Victor mx. BRC 70120 – 1)
Pedro Guida, arranger; vocals by the orchestra

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BLIND BOY FULLER (Fulton Allen): Big House Bound  (E–)

Columbia, SC: October 29, 1938
Vocalion 04897 (mx. SC 25 – 1)
With Sonny Terry, harmonica

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BLACK BOY SHINE (Harold Holiday): Hobo Blues  (E–)

Dallas: June 15, 1937
Vocalion 04003 (mx. DAL 325 – 1)

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Coming Soon: Gus Haenschen — The St. Louis Years

The final installments in Jim Drake’s Haenschen interview series, with never-before published details of his 1916 private recordings, his encounters with Scott Joplin, and much more.

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Collector’s Corner • Some November 2019 Additions — Lucille Hegamin, Lottie Beaman, Five Harmaniacs, Louis Armstrong with Luis Russell, Jimmie Davis, Speckled Red, Feodor Chaliapin

Collector’s Corner • Some November 2019 Additions
Lucille Hegamin, Lottie Beaman, Five Harmaniacs, Louis Armstrong with Luis Russell, Jimmie Davis, Speckled Red, Feodor Chaliapin

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Eclectic’s the word for our November additions to the collection — Enjoy!

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LUCILLE HEGAMIN & HER BLUE FLAME SYNCOPATORS: You’ll Want My Love  (EE– )

New York (probably New York Recording Laboratories): Released June 1921
Arto 9063 (no visible mx. number)

Hegamin never produced another hit to rival “Arkansas Blues,” and her sales seemed to decline with each subsequent Arto release, if the number if surviving copies is any indication. Based on aural and physical characteristics, this master was recorded by NYRL (Paramount), one of at least a half-dozen studios from which Arto commissioned its masters, per data in Ed Kirkeby’s 1921–1923 logs; for details, see American Record Company and Producers, 1888–1950.

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LOTTIE BEAMAN: Honey Blues  (V+, with worn label)

Chicago (probably Rodeheaver Recording Laboratories): c. February 1924
Paramount 12201 (mx. 1695 – 1)
Accompanied by Miles and Milas Pruitt, as The Pruett Twins (sic).

This seems an opportune spot to debunk the old tale that Marsh Laboratories recorded Paramount’s acoustic Chicago masters (the problem being, the best Marsh researchers have never found any evidence that Marsh made acoustic recordings). Paramount house pianist and session arranger Lovie Austin recalled in a 1950 interview that these sessions actually were held in Homer Rodeheaver’s studio (a for-hire operation that at one point employed Vocalion’s former recording engineer), and aural characteristics support her recollection. See ARCP for more details.

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FIVE HARMANIACS: What Makes My Baby Cry?  (E)

New York: February 8, 1927
Victor 20507 (mx. BVE 37750 – 2)
Walter Howard (speaking); no other personnel listed in the Victor files

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FIVE HARMANIACS: It Takes a Good Woman (To Keep a Good Man at Home)  (EE–)

New York: February 8, 1927
Victor 20507 (mx. BVE 37750 – 2)
No personnel listed in the Victor files

Headed by Texas entertainer Claude Shugart, the Five Harmaniacs defy easy categorization. They started out singing cowboy ballads in a vaudeville act titled “Round-Up Tunes,” but in 1926 they headed off in a new direction that caught the attention of the record companies. Now billing themselves as  “A Genuine Musical Novelty,” they began featuring  jazz- and blues-inflected tunes in a style inspired by southern jug and skiffle bands (Brunswick even released two of their titles in its race-record series). But they continued to wear their cowboy outfits on national tours, and sometimes reverted to their original repertoire when playing in and around Texas.

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LUIS RUSSELL’S ORCHESTRA with LOUIS ARMSTRONG (as LOUIS ARMSTRONG & HIS ORCHESTRA): Rockin’ Chair  (E– to V+)

New York:  December 13, 1929
Okeh 8756  (mx. W 403496 – C)
Louis Armstrong (vocal); Hoagy Carmichael (speaking)

In December 1929, Armstrong began fronting Luis Russell’s New York band. After touring the mid-Atlantic region, Armstrong and the Russell band made a triumphant return to Chicago in February 1930, where The Chicago Defender reported, “such an ovation as was given him has not been seen in these parts for a long time.” The unfortunate inclusion here of Hoagy Carmichael (uncredited on the labels, but confirmed in the recording files) was a record-company gimmick, the beginning of a drive to move Armstrong and his records into the mainstream.

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RUFUS PERRYMAN (as SPECKLED RED): Do the Georgia  (E)

Aurora, Illinois (Leland Hotel): December 17, 1938
Bluebird B-7985 (mx. BS 030840 – 1)
Rufus Perryman (vocal, piano); Robert Lee McCoy (guitar); Willie Hatcher (mandolin)

The curious choice of Aurora, Illinois, as an RCA recording location was made in 1937, after the Chicago chapter of the American Federation of Musicians targeted the company for making substandard payments to its race-record artists. Rather than pay decently, RCA moved just beyond the reach of the Chicago local. The company slipped back into Chicago in 1939, only to be threatened with revocation of its AFM recording license if it didn’t begin paying union scale.

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JIMMIE DAVIS: Bear Cat Mama from Horner’s Corners  (V++)

Memphis Auditorium: November 29, 1930
Montgomery Ward M-4283 (Victor mx. BVE 64760 – 2)

1934 original-stamper reissue of Victor 23517. The guitarists are unlisted in the Victor ledger. Tony Russell’s Country Music Records suggests Oscar Woods (guitar) and Ed Schaffer (steel guitar), which if correct, would make this one of the very few racially integrated country-music recordings of the period. Davis went on to make his name with a more sappy sort of country music that included his own “You Are My Sunshine,” the enormous popularity of which helped propel him to the governorship of Louisiana in 1944.

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FEODOR CHALIAPIN & FLORENCE AUSTRAL: Faust – Church Scene (complete in two parts)  (E)

Hayes, Middlesex, England: October 26, 1925
His Master’s Voice D.B.899 (mxs. Cc 7067- 2 / Cc 7075 – 1)
Albert Coates, conductor

From Chaliapin’s first electrical recording session. This was his second issued recording of the Church Scene, the first having been made in Moscow in 1910 with soprano Maria Michailowa.

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Collectors’ Corner (Free MP3 Downloads) • Some February Finds: 1920s Pop (Annette Hanshaw, Banjo Buddy, Al Jolson, Bernie Cummins, Cass Hagan, Baker & Silvers)

Collectors’ Corner • Some February Finds: 1920s Pop (Annette Hanshaw, Banjo Buddy, Al Jolson, Bernie Cummins, Cass Hagan, Baker & Silvers)

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Some favorites from a recent estate-sale cache of late 1920s pop singers and hot dance bands:

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PHIL BAKER, assisted by SID SILVERS: At the Theater  (E)

New York: September 21, 1927
Victor 20970 (mxs. BVE 39117 – 1 / 39118 – 2)
Victor files show only BVE 39117 – 3 as having been mastered.

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HAROLD SANDELMAN (as BANJO BUDDY): Let’s Misbehave  (E)

New York: March 7, 1928
Brunswick 3865 (mx. E 26855 or E 26856)
William F. Wirges (conductor), “Mr. Daulton – monitoring,” per the Brunswick files; accompanying personnel are unlisted. The take used is not indicated in the files or visible in the pressing.

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ANNETTE HANSHAW (as PATSY YOUNG) with THE NEW ENGLANDERS: I Want to Be Bad  (EE+)

New York: March 14, 1929
Velvet Tone 1878-V (Columbia mx. [W] 148077 – 2)
Accompanying personnel listed in Rust’s Jazz Records and similar works are speculative (not Columbia file data).

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CASS HAGAN & HIS PARK CENTRAL HOTEL ORCHESTRA (Franklyn Baur, Lewis James, Elliott Shaw, vocal): The Varsity Drag  (E–)

New York (Okeh studio): September 2, 1927
Columbia 1114-D (mx. W 144617 – 2)
Personnel listed in Rust’s Jazz Records and similar works are speculative (not Columbia file data).

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BERNIE CUMMINS’ ORCHESTRA (Bernie Cummins, vocal): When You’re with Somebody Else  (E)

New York (Brunswick Room #2): January 7, 1928
Brunswick 3772 (mx. E 25875)
Karl Radlach, arranger, per Brunswick files. Personnel listed in Rust’s American Dance Band Discography and derivative works are speculative (not Brunswick file data).

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AL JOLSON with WILLIAM F. WIRGES’ ORCHESTRA: Blue River  (E–)

New York: November 11, 1927
Brunswick 3719 (mx. E 25189)
William F. Wirges (conductor / arranger); Harry Reser (banjo) present as an “extra,” per the Brunswick files; other personnel unlisted.

 

Collectors’ Corner (MP3 Downloads) • Some February Finds – Victor Jazz and Blues Classics on Vinyl

Collectors’ Corner (MP3 Downloads) • Some February Finds – Victor Jazz and Blues Classics on Vinyl

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Several favorites from a nice batch of c. 1960-1970s RCA blank-labeled vinyl pressings from the original Victor stampers. These were made in very small quantities, often in conjunction with reissue programs or for other special purposes, and were not intended for sale. As a result, they rarely turn up in general circulation (as these did, much to our surprise, at a recent estate sale). They are not true “test pressings — although many dealers represent them as such — but are still highly desirable because of their limited availability and superior surfaces. Enjoy!

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MEMPHIS JUG BAND: He’s in the Jail House Now

Memphis Auditorium: November 21, 1930
BVE 62990 – 2  (original issue Victor 23256)

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MEMPHIS JUG BAND (Memphis Minnie [McCoy], vocal): Bumble Bee Blues

Memphis Auditorium: May 26, 1930
BVE 59993 – 2  (original issue Victor V-38599)

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LOUIS DUMAINE’S JAZZOLA EIGHT (Leonard Mitchell, vocal): Franklin Street Blues

New Orleans: March 7, 1927
BVE 37979 – 1  (original issue Victor 20580)

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THE MISSOURIANS: Ozark Mountain Blues

New York: June 3, 1929
BVE 53803 -2  (original issue Victor V-38071)

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THOMAS [FATS] WALLER: Messin’ Around with the Blues

Camden, NJ (Church studio): January 14, 1927
BVE 37361 – 3  (original issue Victor 20655)

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CHARLIE JOHNSON & HIS PARADISE BAND: The Rock [issued as “The Boy in the Boat”]

New York: September 19, 1928
BVE 47531 – 1  (alternate take; original issue in 1939 on Bluebird B-10248)

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Discographical data are from the original Victor files, courtesy of John Bolig.

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