Collector’s Corner (Free MP3s) • Some Late 2019 Operatic Additions — Caruso, Scotti, Farrar, Didur, Sibiriakov, Michailowa, Chaliapin

Collector’s Corner (Free MP3s) • Some Late 2019 Operatic Additions — Caruso, Scotti, Farrar, Didur, Sibiriakov, Michailowa, Chaliapin

 

A few new arrivals to the opera collection, added over the last couple of months — some fairly common, some quite scarce, but all personal favorites.

(Jazz and blues fans: Don’t despair, we’ll be back in a few weeks with some choice new selections. In the meantime, give a listen — a little horizon-broadening for the new year!)

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ENRICO CARUSO: Cavalleria Rusticana (Mascagni) – Siciliana (E–)

Milan: November 30, 1902
Gramophone Concert Record 52418 (mx. 2876b)
Salvatore Cottone, piano

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GERALDINE FARRAR & ANTONIO SCOTTI: La Bohême (Puccini) – Mimi, speravo di trovarvi qui (E)

Camden, NJ: February 18, 1908
Victor 10007 (mx. C 5087 – 2)
1923 coupled reissue of Victor 89016

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ADAMO DIDUR: Mefistofele (Boito) – Son lo spirito che nega (E)

Milan: April 23, 1908
Fonotipia 92226 (mx. XPh 3176)

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LEV SIBIRIAKOV: Songs and Dances of Death (Mussorgsky) –
Field-Marshall Death
(EE–)

St. Petersburg, Russia: November 12, 1913
Amour 022328 (coupled #M022327) (mx. 2904c)

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LEV SIBIRIAKOV & MARIA MICHAILOWA: Faust (Gounod) –
Church Scene, Part 1
(EE–)

St. Petersburg, Russia: September 27, 1910
Muzpred 024048 (coupled #022172) (mx. 2045c)
Early 1920s Soviet pressing from the original stampers

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FEODOR CHALIAPIN: Aleko (Rachmaninoff) – The Moon Is High in the Sky (aka All The Gypsy Camp Is Sleeping) (EE+)

London (C Studio, Small Queen’s Hall): November 11, 1929
Victor 14902 (Gramophone Co. mx. Cc 18156 – 1)
Orchestra directed by Lawrance Collingwood. This is a “concert” version of the aria, with portions of the original score deleted; Chaliapin’s rendition of the complete aria can be heard on HMV D.B.691, acoustically recorded in 1923.

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Dick Spottswood’s Columbia “C” Series Discography (1908 – 1923) • Free Download Now Available

We’re happy to announce that the next installment in Dick Spottswood’s Columbia ethnic-series discography is now available for free download. This section covers the C-prefixed series, which was intended for the Spanish-speaking markets — a tantalizing mixture of performances by Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and other Latino artists (most of them recorded in their native countries by traveling Columbia engineers), operatic arias and light classics from domestic and imported masters, and various odd-and-ends “repurposed” from other catalogs.
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Click here
to download the discography in PDF format (approximately 5 megabytes). As with the previous installment, this material may be copied or distributed for personal use, provided that the source is cited. Sale or other commercial use is prohibited.

Dick’s latest update of his Columbia “E” series discography will be posted soon.

Forgotten American Recording Pioneers • Alexander Maloof

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Alexander Maloof was a second-generation Syrian immigrant who carved a niche for himself in the 1920s with the Maloof and Music of the Orient labels. Although known primarily for championing Middle Eastern music, Maloof was also a capable pop composer. He was a survivor as well — when times got tough in the early 1930s, he kept himself afloat by recording pipe-organ solos for skating rinks and funeral homes.

Maloof’s exact birth date remains questionable. His Social Security death record states that he was born on August 10, 1886. However, his tombstone states 1887; the 1920 and 1930 U.S. Census files state 1885, while the 1940 Census goes far afield with “about 1895″; and a copyright filing with the U.S. Patent & Trademark office lists 1884. Although various publications in the 1920s stated that Maloof was Turkish or Egyptian, his passport application and Social Security records state that he was born in Syria. The family, headed by Chames Maloof, apparently arrived in the U.S. in or around 1894, based on a 1925 report. On October 29 of that year, Maloof filed a declaration of intent to apply for naturalized citizenship.

By the early 1910s, Maloof was becoming well-known on the New York musical scene. In 1913 he recorded two of his original piano compositions — “Al-Ja-Za-Yer” (made as a test on July 24, and subsequently accepted for release) and “A Trip to Syria” (on September 16) — for the Victor Talking Machine Company. In a unusual move, the titles were assigned to both the ethnic and standard catalogs, as Victor 65830 and Victor 17443, respectively. Apparently, neither release sold well enough to earn Maloof a second Victor session.

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ALEXANDER MALOOF (piano): A Trip to Syria

New York: September 16, 1913
Victor 17443 (mx. B 13808 – 2)

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The E. T. Paull Music Company published two of Maloof’s dance numbers, “Ticklish Sensation” and “The Egyptian Glide,” in 1914. The latter was available in two arrangements — Maloof’s own tango version, and a one-step-step/two-step/trot arrangement credited to Paull himself. By the late ’teens, Maloof was operating his own music studio in New York and was attracting notice for concert appearances at which he featured his original compositions.

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The tango version of Maloof’s “Egyptian Glide” (1914). E. T. Paull also provided a “One-Step,Two-Step, Trot” arrangement.

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The Maloof Phonograph Company was launched in 1920 to  specialize in traditional Middle Eastern fare. Its earliest labels show either no copyright date, or a 1920 copyright, which does not appear to have been formally registered. The earliest pressings are from masters in a three-digit M-prefixed series of unknown origin, some of which show master-broker Earle W. Jones’ characteristic handwritten “J” in the wax. Physical characteristics suggest that they were pressed by the Siemon Hard Rubber Company, with which Jones was affiliated.

By late 1922 production of the Maloof label had shifted to the Starr Piano Company (Gennett), corresponding to a new (and  also apparently unregistered) 1922 label copyright date. Maloof would become one of Gennett’s most active clients, rivaling that other highly prolific customer — Homer Rodeheaver — for the amount of time booked in Gennett’s studios.

A second Maloof line, Music of the Orient (credited to the likely fictitious “Orient Company”) appeared in or around 1923, also produced by Gennett, and using some of the same masters as the Maloof label. Although Maloof’s masters were numbered in the standard Gennett series, most were recorded for his exclusive use.

The Maloof and Music of the Orient labels seem to have disappeared by late 1925, but Maloof and his associates continued to record in Gennett’s New York studios into the summer of 1931, covering everything from Egyptian and Syrian folk music to old warhorses like “Home Sweet Home” and assorted Christian hymns. Gennett picked up the occasional title for its own use, but most were pressed as Personal records, at Maloof’s own expense. In-between, there was a visit to Victor’s New York studio on February 15, 1926, with his Oriental Orchestra. The session yielded four ethnic-catalog releases, one of which (“Egyptiana”) was also issued in the Mexican series, where it was retitled “Somali.”

Maloof held the dubious honor of having recorded the last masters ever made in Gennett’s legendary Long Island City studio, in late June 1931. (June 30, shown on the ledger sheet, is  the date on which masters were received in Richmond, not the recording date. The ledger sheet for the final Long Island session is headed “1932” in error; master numbers are contiguous with the May–June 1931 sessions listed on the previous sheets.) Maloof’s final Gennett sessions included organ solos intended for use in the company’s Chapel series, which was marketed to funeral parlors.

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From the Gennett ledgers — Top: The final session in the Long Island City studio, in late June 1931.  Bottom: One of several earlier 1931 Maloof sessions. Note that the recordings were dubbed to new N-series masters; several dubbings from these sessions were released commercially on Champion and Superior in the early 1930s, and even on Decca’s revived version of the Champion label in the mid-1930s.

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Chames Maloff died in1930, and Alexander moved to Los Angeles in 1931. He was living there by September 2 of that year, when his application for citizenship was finally accepted. However, he seems to have returned East on occasion, launching his new Orient label (credited to the Maloof Music Company of Englewood, New Jersey, and using newly recorded material) at some point in the 1940s. He died in Los Angeles on May 1, 1968.

 

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The Maloof family plot in Angelus Rosedale Cemetery,
Los Angeles. George Maloof made a few recordings for his brother’s label in 1920. (Courtesy of Irv Lightner)

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The Playlist • Emanuel Feuermann Plays Dvorak’s Cello Concerto (1928 / 1929)

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EMANUEL FEUERMANN (cello) with Members of the Berlin State Opera Orchestra (Michael Taube, conductor): Concerto in B Minor, Op. 104 (Dvorak)

Berlin: April 30, 1928 (first and second movements)
Berlin: September 27, 1929 (third movement)


Columbia G-68037-D – G-68041-D
(mxs. W 2-20748 – 2-20753; W 2-21582 – W 2-21584)

Caution — Large file (32mb)

Leo Slezak in the Pathé Studio (c. 1913)

MSP-TMW-1914_slezak-patheThe location is probably Vienna, reputedly the site of Slezak’s 1913 Pathé session. The photo was reproduced in the September 1914 Talking Machine World, just as the New York–based Pathé Frères Phonograph Company (the French company’s U.S. licensee) was preparing to unveil Pathé discs to the American public. The company had only recently begun to make its own recordings and thus had to rely heavily on imported discs, like Slezak’s, to fill the initial catalog.

The oversized cylinder master, from which the disc masters would be transcribed pantographically, can be seen at the far right. This photo (along with others taken in the American studio and in various foreign locations) contradicts the popular anecdotal tale that Pathé’s recording equipment was a jealously guarded secret, hidden behind locked doors and never to be glimpsed by performers or the public.