Forgotten American Recording Pioneers • Joseph Moskowitz (Cymbalom Solos, 1916)

msp-vicsup_11-1916-23_mosko

Joseph Moskowitz
(b. Romania, 1879 – d. Washington DC, June 27, 1954)
From the November 1916 Victor supplement, courtesy of John Bolig

.

.

JOSEPH MOSKOWITZ (Edward King, piano): Panama Pacific Drag

New York: February 4, 1916
Victor 17978 (mx. 17118 – 1)

.

JOSEPH MOSKOWITZ (Max Yussim, piano): Chasen Senem (Turkish Medley, No. 2)

New York: July 19, 1916
Victor 67988 (mx. B 18204 – 2)

.

JOSEPH MOSKOWITZ (Max Yussim, piano): Sadiguerer  Chusid — Hebrew Dance

New York: March 27, 1916
Victor 67827 (mx. B 17390 – 1)

.

JOSEPH MOSKOWITZ (Max Yussim, piano): Hungarian Dance, No. 5 (Brahms)

 

New York: February 4, 1916
Victor 17973 (mx. B 17116 – 1)

.

JOSEPH MOSKOWITZ (Max Yussim, piano): Argentine Dance (Tango Argentino)

New York: February 4, 1916
Victor 18155 (mx. B 17113 – 2)

.

JOSEPH MOSKOWITZ (Edward King, piano): Operatic Rag

New York: February 4, 1916
Victor 17978 (mx. B 17117 – 2)

___________

Discographical data from Dick Spottswood’s Ethnic Music on Records
(University of Illinois Press)

The Playlist • Mexican Favorites (1905 – 1938)

SUNSET-1126.

.

BANDA DE ESTADA MAYOR DE MÉXICO: Maria y Leonorcita — Danzones Yucatecos

Mexico City; Released 1905
Edison Gold Moulded 18767

.

JESÚS ABREGO & LEOPOLDO PICAZO: La rancherita

Mexico City; Original release October 1909
Edison Blue Amberol 22058 (1913 reissue of Amberol 6058)

.

TRIO  INSTRUMENTAL ARRIAGA (Joaquín Arriaga, mandolin): El novio de tacha

Mexico City; Original release May 1910
Edison Blue Amberol 22076 (1913 reissue of Amberol 6076)

.

ENRIQUE ESPINOZA: El Borrachito

Los Angeles: c. June 1925
Sunset 1126 (mx. 777)

.

LIDYA MENDOZA: Una Cruz

Blue Bonnet Hotel, San Antonio: October 25, 1938
Montgomery Ward M-7982 (mx. BS–28629-1)
Accompanists unlisted in Victor files

.

EL CIEGO MELQUIADES: Paulita

Texas Hotel, San Antonio: August 15, 1935
Montgomery Ward M-4870 (mx. BS-94591-1)
Melquiades Rodriguez, violin; Enrique Morales, guitar

.

Forgotten American Recording Pioneers • Alexander Maloof

msp_maloof-labels

.

Alexander Maloof was a second-generation Syrian immigrant who carved a niche for himself in the 1920s with the Maloof and Music of the Orient labels. Although known primarily for championing Middle Eastern music, Maloof was also a capable pop composer. He was a survivor as well — when times got tough in the early 1930s, he kept himself afloat by recording pipe-organ solos for skating rinks and funeral homes.

Maloof’s exact birth date remains questionable. His Social Security death record states that he was born on August 10, 1886. However, his tombstone states 1887; the 1920 and 1930 U.S. Census files state 1885, while the 1940 Census goes far afield with “about 1895″; and a copyright filing with the U.S. Patent & Trademark office lists 1884. Although various publications in the 1920s stated that Maloof was Turkish or Egyptian, his passport application and Social Security records state that he was born in Syria. The family, headed by Chames Maloof, apparently arrived in the U.S. in or around 1894, based on a 1925 report. On October 29 of that year, Maloof filed a declaration of intent to apply for naturalized citizenship.

By the early 1910s, Maloof was becoming well-known on the New York musical scene. In 1913 he recorded two of his original piano compositions — “Al-Ja-Za-Yer” (made as a test on July 24, and subsequently accepted for release) and “A Trip to Syria” (on September 16) — for the Victor Talking Machine Company. In a unusual move, the titles were assigned to both the ethnic and standard catalogs, as Victor 65830 and Victor 17443, respectively. Apparently, neither release sold well enough to earn Maloof a second Victor session.

______________________________________________________________________________

.

msp_maloof-vic-17443

.

ALEXANDER MALOOF (piano): A Trip to Syria

New York: September 16, 1913
Victor 17443 (mx. B 13808 – 2)

_____________________________________________________________________________

.

The E. T. Paull Music Company published two of Maloof’s dance numbers, “Ticklish Sensation” and “The Egyptian Glide,” in 1914. The latter was available in two arrangements — Maloof’s own tango version, and a one-step-step/two-step/trot arrangement credited to Paull himself. By the late ’teens, Maloof was operating his own music studio in New York and was attracting notice for concert appearances at which he featured his original compositions.

.

msp-sm_maloof_egyptian-glid

The tango version of Maloof’s “Egyptian Glide” (1914). E. T. Paull also provided a “One-Step,Two-Step, Trot” arrangement.

.

The Maloof Phonograph Company was launched in 1920 to  specialize in traditional Middle Eastern fare. Its earliest labels show either no copyright date, or a 1920 copyright, which does not appear to have been formally registered. The earliest pressings are from masters in a three-digit M-prefixed series of unknown origin, some of which show master-broker Earle W. Jones’ characteristic handwritten “J” in the wax. Physical characteristics suggest that they were pressed by the Siemon Hard Rubber Company, with which Jones was affiliated.

By late 1922 production of the Maloof label had shifted to the Starr Piano Company (Gennett), corresponding to a new (and  also apparently unregistered) 1922 label copyright date. Maloof would become one of Gennett’s most active clients, rivaling that other highly prolific customer — Homer Rodeheaver — for the amount of time booked in Gennett’s studios.

A second Maloof line, Music of the Orient (credited to the likely fictitious “Orient Company”) appeared in or around 1923, also produced by Gennett, and using some of the same masters as the Maloof label. Although Maloof’s masters were numbered in the standard Gennett series, most were recorded for his exclusive use.

The Maloof and Music of the Orient labels seem to have disappeared by late 1925, but Maloof and his associates continued to record in Gennett’s New York studios into the summer of 1931, covering everything from Egyptian and Syrian folk music to old warhorses like “Home Sweet Home” and assorted Christian hymns. Gennett picked up the occasional title for its own use, but most were pressed as Personal records, at Maloof’s own expense. In-between, there was a visit to Victor’s New York studio on February 15, 1926, with his Oriental Orchestra. The session yielded four ethnic-catalog releases, one of which (“Egyptiana”) was also issued in the Mexican series, where it was retitled “Somali.”

Maloof held the dubious honor of having recorded the last masters ever made in Gennett’s legendary Long Island City studio, in late June 1931. (June 30, shown on the ledger sheet, is  the date on which masters were received in Richmond, not the recording date. The ledger sheet for the final Long Island session is headed “1932” in error; master numbers are contiguous with the May–June 1931 sessions listed on the previous sheets.) Maloof’s final Gennett sessions included organ solos intended for use in the company’s Chapel series, which was marketed to funeral parlors.

.

msp-gnt_maloof-composite-1

From the Gennett ledgers — Top: The final session in the Long Island City studio, in late June 1931.  Bottom: One of several earlier 1931 Maloof sessions. Note that the recordings were dubbed to new N-series masters; several dubbings from these sessions were released commercially on Champion and Superior in the early 1930s, and even on Decca’s revived version of the Champion label in the mid-1930s.

.

Chames Maloff died in1930, and Alexander moved to Los Angeles in 1931. He was living there by September 2 of that year, when his application for citizenship was finally accepted. However, he seems to have returned East on occasion, launching his new Orient label (credited to the Maloof Music Company of Englewood, New Jersey, and using newly recorded material) at some point in the 1940s. He died in Los Angeles on May 1, 1968.

 

msp_maloof-grave

The Maloof family plot in Angelus Rosedale Cemetery,
Los Angeles. George Maloof made a few recordings for his brother’s label in 1920. (Courtesy of Irv Lightner)

.

The Playlist • Some Columbia “E” Series Favorites (1908 – 1920)

Be sure to check out Dick Spottswood’s excellent new Columbia “E” Series Discography, available as a free download courtesy of the author and Mainspring Press.

.

ABE SCHWARTZ’S ORCHESTRA: Sher — Part 2 [Jewish]

New York: c. October 1920
Columbia E4905 (mx. 86691 – 2)

.

STEFAN RADIN (accordion): Malo Kolo [Serbian]

New York: c. June 1917
Columbia E3638 (mx. 58373 – 1)

 .

TAMBURASKO DRUSTVO: Ah, haj, Boze doj [Serbian]

New York: c. March 1918
Columbia E4190 (mx. 84187 – 1)

.

VINDENSKA SALON KAPELA: Tance detektivu — Americká Melodie [Czech]

Unknown location and date (U.S. release 1913)
Columbia E1532 (mx. 66953 – 1)

.

CHINESE NOVELTY ORCHESTRA: Chinese One-Step — Part 1 [Chinese]

Unknown location and date (U.S. release 1920)
Columbia E4506 (mx. 85544 – 1)

.

ARISTIDE SIGISMONDI: ’E guaie ’e Nicola [Italian]

New York: c. March 1917
Columbia E3436 (mx. 58149 – 1)

.

BAND with VOCAL CHORUS: Schorsch’l, kauf mir ein Automobil [German (British composition)]

Berlin: c. September 1908
Columbia E654 (mx. 41669 – 1)
A retitling of “The Perman’s Brooklyn Cake Walk” (a.k.a. “Dream of the Rarebit Fiend”), with added lyrics that have nothing to do with either title.

.

BILLY WILLIAMS: I’ve Found Kelly [English (Australian artist)]

London: 1911
Columbia E1777 (mx. 27411 – 1)

Dick Spottswood’s Columbia “E” Series Discography Now Available for Free Download

We’re pleased to offer Dick Spottswood’s newly updated, 300-page Columbia “E” Series Discography as a free download for your personal use, courtesy of the author.

To download, click the “Free Online Discographies” link in the menu to your left. You’ll need Adobe Acrobat or Acrobat Reader (Versions 5.0 and later) to view the file. This file is offered for personal, non-commercial use only; please review the use notice before downloading.

.

MSP_columbia-E2

.

Dick is one of the great pioneers in discographical research on vernacular music of all sorts, as well as a long-time author, record producer, and radio host.

During the 1950s, Dick began canvassing for forgotten sound recordings containing a broad range of music — originally, jazz, blues, and country, later tackling the largely unexplored field of early ethnic records. In the 1960s he began sharing his finds on  countless reissues, including those on his own Melodeon and Piedmont labels, and co-founded Bluegrass Unlimited magazine. He later produced and annotated the important fifteen-LP series,  Folk Music in America, for the Library of Congress.

Dick’s masterworks are his multi-volume Ethnic Music on Records: A Discography of Ethnic Recordings Produced in the United States, 1893 to 1942 (University of Indiana Press, 1990);  and Country Music Sources, with Meade & Meade (John Edwards Memorial Forum and University of North Carolina Press, 2002) — both winners of ARSC Awards for Excellence, and works that we use constantly — and Banjo on the Mountain: Wade Mainer’s First Hundred Years, with Stephen Wade (University of Mississippi Press, 2010).

In addition to his other books and articles, Dick’s been an important contributor to many major discographical projects, both in print and online. He’s a founding member of The Association for Recorded Sound Collections, which honored him with their Lifetime Achievement Award in 2003. The International Bluegrass Music Association presented him their Distinguished Service Award in October 2009.

The Playlist • Balinese Gamelan Gems (Late 1920s)

From a historic and very well-traveled group of location recordings that were issued in Germany in 1931 as part of Erich M. Von Hornbostel’s “Musik des Orient” set on Odeon, resurfaced in England in 1934 as “Music of the Orient” (Parlophone), then made their way to American Decca’s under-appreciated Odeon-Parlophone series in 1939.

.

GAMELAN ANKLUNG — Berong Pengetjet

Bali: 1928
Decca Odeon-Parlophone Series 20125 (mx. JAB 581)

.

GAMELAN DJOGED — Tjetjing Kereman

Bali: 1928
Decca Odeon-Parlophone Series 20126 (mx. JAB 596)

.

GAMELAN GONG — Lagu Kebiar

Bali: Before 1931
Decca Odeon-Parlophone Series 20127 (mx. 28180)

The Playlist • Melquiades Rodríguez, the Blind Fiddler (San Antonio, 1935)

Two selections from Bluebird’s B-2400 Spanish-language series that would not have sounded out-of-place in the country-music list (a fact not lost on RCA, which also issued  them in Bluebird’s domestic B-6000 series, with label credits in English to “The Blind Fiddler.” Ethnic Music on Records shows English credits on the corresponding Montgomery Ward issues as well, but copies inspected thus far are in Spanish:

MSP_MW-M4870B_rodriguez

.

MELQUIADES RODRÍGUEZ (violin; probably with Enrique Morales, guitar): Paulita — Polka

Texas Hotel, San Antonio: August 15, 1935
..(Eli Oberstein, recording director)
Montgomery Ward M-4870 ( as “El Ciego Melqiuades”)
Mx. BS 94589 – 1 (reissue of Bluebird B-2411)

.

MELQUIADES RODRÍGUEZ (violin; probably with Enrique Morales, guitar): Delgadita — Polka

Texas Hotel, San Antonio: August 15, 1935
..(Eli Oberstein, recording director)
Montgomery Ward M-4870 ( as “El Ciego Melqiuades”)
Mx. BS 94591 – 1 (reissue of Bluebird B-2411)

Eli Oberstein is not credited in the RCA files, but photographs exist of him on the August 1935 San Antonio trip. Morales is not credited in the RCA files for these particular titles; however, the adjacent masters, recorded at the same session, are guitar duets by Rodríguez and Morales.

.

The Playlist • Yiddish Vocal and Klezmer Favorites (1913 – 1923)

.

AARON LEBEDEFF (vocal with ABE SCHWARTZ’S ORCHESTRA):
Ich Bin a Border Bei Mein Weib

New York: c. January 1923
Vocalion 14502  (mx. 10587)

.

ABE SCHWARTZ’S ORCHESTRA: Sher — Part 2

New York: October 1920
Columbia E4905  (mx. 86692 – 1)

.

.

HARRY KANDEL’S ORCHESTRA: Rusiche Shaer (Russian Dance) —  Part 1

New York: June 25, 1918
Victor 72102  (mx. B 21666 – 4)

.

JACOB HOFFMAN (xylophone) with HARRY KANDEL’S ORCHESTRA:
Doina and Hora

Camden, NJ: January 25, 1923Camden, NJ: January 25, 1923
Victor 77163  (mx. B 28671 – 1)

.

MORDECAI HERSHMAN (vocal): Mikita

New York: June 14, 1923
Victor 68625  (mx. C 28084 – 2)
Nathaniel Shilkret, arranger / conductor

.

PINCHOS JASSINOWSKY (vocal): Burekes

New York: October 10, 1919
Victor 72308  (mx. B 22352 – 3)
Nathaniel Shilkret, organ

.

ABE ELENKRIG’S ORCHESTRA: Fon der Choope

New York: c. April 4, 1913
Columbia E1393  (mx. 38756 – 1)

.

ABRAHAM ELENKRIG’S ORCHESTRA: Machotonim zum Tisch

New York: c. April 4, 1913
Columbia E1394  (mx. 38758 – 1)

 

ABE SCHWARTZ’S ORCHESTRA (as Oriental Orchestra): The Silver Wedding

New York: c. August 1918
Columbia E3618  (mx. 58541-1)

The Playlist • Klezmer and Other Ethnic Gems (1909–1924)

 

MSP_victor-63512-B.

HARRY KANDEL’S ORCHESTRA: Kiever Bulgar (Dance from Kiev)

New York: May 6, 1921
Victor 73436 (mx. B 25255 – 1)

.

ANONYMOUS ACCORDION AND GUITAR DUET: Andikristo  [Greek]

Constantinople: March 29, 1909
Victor 63512 (Gramophone Co. mx. 12578b)

.

SERBIAN TAMBOURITZA QUARTET: Aj, Haj, Boze Daj

New York: March 1918
Columbia E4190 (mx. 84187 – 1)

.

HOYER INSTRUMENTAL TRIO: Na Poskok (Jumping Polka)  [Slovenian]

Cleveland, OH: November 30, 1924
Victor 77915 (mx. B 31239 – 1)

_____________

Discographical data are from Dick Spottswood’s Ethnic Music on Records (University of Illinois Press)

 

.

 

“Princess Watahwaso” Obituary (1969)

“Princess Watahwaso” in real life was Lucy Nicola Poolaw, a Penobscot Indian from Maine. For many years she toured on the concert and Chautauqua circuits, often accompanied by pianist-composer Thurlow Lieurance of “By the Waters of Minnetonka” fame. She did a great deal to spread awareness of Native American music, even if her material was sometimes Europeanized nearly beyond recognition, as in the example posted here.

This obituary is from the Evening Express, Portland, Maine, March 20, 1969 (Bill Bryant papers). Poolaw was, of course, far from being “among the first” to record vocal music for Victor. Her Victor records were issued in the late ‘teens, in the “Educational” series.

 MSP_watahwaso_composite.

PRINCESS WATAHWASO (LUCY POOLAW), with THURLOW LIEURANCE (piano) and HERBERT SMALL (flute): Aooah / Her Blanket

Camden, NJ: October 30, 1917 — Released May 1918 (Educational Catalog)
Victor 18418  (mx. B 21015 – 1)

.