Mainspring Press Website Changes – August 2017

We will be deleting the Articles section of the Mainspring Press website later this month. Some articles date back to the early 2000s, and many could use some updating. The best and most popular of the group will be revised and reposted as blog features over the next few months.

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The rest will go to their well-earned rest in offline storage. You’re still welcome to download the articles for personal use while they’re available — just keep in mind that copyrights and publication restrictions continue to apply, even to deleted articles.

 

Free Personal-Use Download: Brian Rust’s Complete “Jazz and Ragtime Records, 1897-1942” (6th and Final Edition)

Response to the initial Personal Use Edition of the late Brian Rust’s JR-6 (1917-1934) has been so positive that we’re now making the complete work (1897-1942) available free of charge for the benefit of the collecting and research communities, in keeping with Brian’s wishes.

This edition is in Adobe Acrobat only. (A plain-text file is not being provided, but text files can be created from Acrobat by various methods. Please note that we are unable to provide any technical assistance in this regard; information can be found in your Acrobat or word-processor documentation, or online.)

Be sure to open the Bookmarks sidebar, on the left side of the screen, for easy navigation through the entries. Abbreviation lists  will be found at the end of the file. Indexes are not included, nor are they needed any longer, thanks to Acrobat’s superior search-engine capabilities.

 

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD BRIAN RUST’S
JAZZ & RAGTIME RECORDS, 1897-1842

Free Complete 6th Edition, for Personal Use Only (~ 10mb)

 

LICENSE INFORMATION: By downloading this file, you signify your understanding of and agreement to the following terms:

All data in this work have been placed in the public domain (i.e., released from copyright) by Mainspring Press LLC, the sole copyright holder in this work by 2001 contractual assignment from Brian Rust.

You may copy, print out, distribute, alter, and/or incorporate this data in other works free of charge and without permission, for personal, non-commercial, non-profit use only, provided that you fully cite the source.

Mainspring Press retains the full and exclusive worldwide commercial publication rights (as distinguished from copyright) in this work. This work may not be published or otherwise distributed commercially, by any method (including but not limited to print, digital, and/or online media) without the prior written consent of Mainspring Press.

________

Note: Please do not send additions and corrections to Mainspring Press; we are not producing any further editions of this work.

Association for Recorded Sound Collections’ 51st Annual Conference

The Association for Recorded Sound Collections’ 51st Annual Conference will be held next week in San Antonio, Texas, and promises to be one of the most interesting yet.

If you haven’t followed the group for a while, rest assured — it’s no longer Your Grandpa’s ARSC. The membership is becoming increasingly diverse, and this year’s conference includes  presentations on such wide-ranging topics as Houston hip hop, the historic Texas recording scene, border radio, Motown, women in the recording industry, digital restoration and management of sound recordings, metadata management for sound archives, crowd-sourced cataloging of sound recordings via social media, and copyright issues. (The traditionalists among us will also find plenty of interest, including a collectors’ round-table, a Robert Johnson walking tour, and presentations on Papa Charlie Jackson, Olga Samaroff, Victor Herbert, musical rarities on radio transcriptions and film, discographical issues, and more.)

Click here to download a PDF copy of the conference program. Registration information and further details are available on the ARSC website.

 

 

The Playlist • Five Harmaniacs (1926–1927)

MSP_five-harmaniacs_composite

 

The usual members of this group were Jerry Adams, Hampton Durand, Walter Howard, Ned Nestor, Clyde Shugart, and Percy Stoner (with the addition of pianist Tommy Reilly on one oddball  Brunswick session at which the Harmaniacs had no harmonica player — the only instance in which at least partial personnel were listed in the recording files).

 

HARMANIAC FIVE: Harmaniac Blues

Chicago (Marsh Laboratories): c. May 1926
Paramount 20476 (Marsh mx. 1079)
From a tape dubbing supplied by the late Gilbert Louey. Jazz Records shows two banjos and no guitar, in error (one of each is audible, even through the horrendous surface noise and notoriously inaccurate “Marsh Sound”).

 

FIVE HARMANIACS: Coney Island Washboard

New York: September 17, 1926
Victor 20293 (mx. BVE 36327 – 2)
No personnel listed in the Victor files.

 

FIVE HARMANIACS (with uncredited vocal): Sleepy Blues

New York: February 24, 1927
Brunswick 7002 (mx. E 22013, renumbered from E 4587)
Race-series release (although the band was white). Originally recorded as a test master (Vocalion mx. E 4587, unissued on that label), and subsequently transferred to Brunswick on March 18, 1927, and assigned Brunswick mx. E 22013. No personnel are listed in the Brunswick-Vocalion files. Jazz Records shows a recording date of February 4, in error.

 

FIVE HARMANIACS: It Takes A Good Woman (To Keep a Good Man at Home)

New York: February 8, 1927
Victor mx. BVE 37751 – 1 (unissued in 78-rpm form)
From a c. 1960s blank-label vinyl pressing from the original stamper. Take 2 was released on Victor 20507 in April 1927. No personnel listed in the Victor files.

 

FIVE HARMANIACS (Walter Howard, speech): What Makes My Baby Cry?

New York: February 8, 1927
Victor mx. BVE 37750 – 1 (unissued in 78-rpm form)
From a c. 1960s blank-label vinyl pressing from the original stamper. Take 2 was released on Victor 20507 in April 1927. No personnel, aside from Howard, are listed in the Victor files.

More Discographic Updates: Correct Personnel for Okeh’s 1927 “Ted Wallace” Sessions, from Ed Kirkeby’s Payroll Books

MSP_kirkeby-ed_3
Ed Kirkeby

Some more corrections to the undocumented personnel listings for Ed Kirkeby groups that appear in Johnson & Shirley’s American Dance Bands on Films and Records — this time for the 1927 Okeh sessions by Kirkeby’s conventional dance orchestra that were issued under the name of “Ted Wallace,” along with  various other pseudonyms.

The correct personnel shown here are from Ed Kirkeby’s payroll books; see the previous posts for details on the Kirkeby archival materials. Names in boldface are correct entries from the payroll books (an underline indicates a name that does not appear in the ADBFR listing); struck-out names are incorrect guesses in ADBFR. In some cases, musicians the ADBFR compilers state are “definitely present” definitely are not.

ADBFR’s listings for the 1928–1929 Okeh and Columbia “Wallace” sessions show only the compiler’s “collective personnel,” consisting of about 45 names (read: “Throw enough crap at the wall, and something’s bound to stick”). Actually, Kirkeby’s payroll books contain very specific personnel for all of those sessions (including some names not found among the “collective”), which we’ll consider posting if there’s sufficient interest in the current posts.

 

___________________________________

New York: February 14, 1927

“Oh! Lizzie” (mx. 80418, as “Okay Kate” in EK log); “The Cat” (mx. 80419); “My Regular Gal” (mx. 80420, remade March 17)

 

Tpt: Chelsea Quealey, Roy Johnston, Bill Moore

Tbn: Tommy Dorsey, Abe Lincoln “definitely present”  [?; one of the unidentified below?]

Reeds: Arnold Brillhart “definitely present,” Sam Ruby, Adrian Rollini  Pete Pumiglio, Spencer Clark

Vln: Hal White, Joe LaFaro

Pno: Jack Russin  Lennie Hayton

Bjo: Tommy Felline  Carl Kress

Percussion: Herb Weil  [?; one of the unidentified below?]

Unidentified instrument(s): R. Busch, R. Rossan

Note: Kirkeby originally entered a $50 payment to himself, which he crossed-out.

____________________

New York: March 17, 1927

“My Regular Gal” (remake, take D); “Nesting Time” (mx. 80639); “For Mary and Me” (mx. 80640)

 

Tpt: Sylvester Ahola, Chelsea Quealy

Tbn: Ivan Johnston  Edward Lapp

Reeds: Arnold Brillhart “definitely present,” Bobby Davis, Sam Ruby, Adrian Rollini

Vln: Al Duffy or Hal White  [none listed]

Pno: Jack Russin

Bjo: Tommy Felline

Percussion: Herb Weil

Unidentified instrument(s): An unidentified artist was paid $15 for this session

Note: Kirkeby originally entered a $50 payment to himself, which he crossed-out.

____________________

New York: June 27, 1927

“Bless Her Little Heart” (mx. 81110) / “Who-oo? You-oo, That’s Who” (mx. 81111) / Pleading (mx. 81112) / Love and Kisses (mx. 81113)

 

Tpt: Chelsea Quealey, Frank Cush?

Tbn: Abe Lincoln  Tommy Dorsey

Reeds: Johnny Rude or Arnold Brillhart or Sam Ruby  Bob Fallon, Bobby Davis, Adrian Rollini

Vln: [None listed]

Pno: Jack Russin

Bjo: Tommy Felline

Percussion: Herb Weil

Unidentified instrument(s): [?] Black

____________________

New York: September 9, 1927

“Cornfed” (mx. 81429) / “Buffalo Rhythm” (mx. 81430) / “Zulu Wail” (mx. 81431)

 

Tpt: Chelsea Quealey, Frank Cush

Tbn: Tommy Dorsey or Abe Lincoln  Joe Vargas

Reeds: Bobby Davis or Johnny Rude or Arnold Brillhart, Adrian Rollini, Sam Ruby, Bob Fallon, Pete Pumiglio, Spencer Clark

Vln: [None listed]

Pno: Jack Russin

Bjo: Tommy Felline

Percussion: Herb Weil

____________________

New York: November 23, 1927

“Mary” (mx. 81858) / “Changes” (mx. 81859)

 

Tpt: Henry Levine  Chelsea Quealey

Tbn: Al Philburn

Reeds: Harold Marcus, Sam Ruby  Pete Pumiglio, Bob Fallon

Vln: Al Duffy

Pno: Jack Russin

Bjo: Tommy Felline

Bass: Jack Hansen  [None listed]

Percussion: Herb Weil

Unidentified instrument(s): [?] Black, [?] Hart, [?] Lloyd

____________________

New York: December 7, 1927

“For My Baby” (mx. 81924) / “There’s Something Spanish in Your Eyes” (mx. 81925) / “Cobblestones” (mx. 81926)

 

Tpt: Chelsea Quealey, Henry Levine

Tbn: Al Philburn

Reeds: Harold Marcus  Sam Ruby, Pete Pumiglio

Vln: Al Duffy   Joe LaFaro

Pno: Jack Russin

Bjo: Tommy Felline

Bass: Jack Hansen

Percussion: Herb Weil

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Discographic Update: Corrected Personnel for the 1927 Okeh “Goofus Five” Sessions, from Ed Kirkeby’s Payroll Book

We continue with our corrections to the undocumented (and thus, often very incorrect) personnel listings in Johnson & Shirley’s American Dance Bands on Films and Records, successor to Brian Rust’s American Dance Band Discography.

The following listings, taken from Ed Kirkeby’s payroll books,  correct ADBFR’s speculative personnel for the 1927 “Goofus Five” sessions at Okeh’s New York studio. Names in boldface are correct personnel, from the payroll books. Struck-out names are incorrect guesses that appear in ADBFR. See the previous posting for more information on the Kirkeby archival materials.

____________________________________________

New York: February 8, 1927

“Farewell Blues” (mx. 80402) / “I Wish I Could Shimmy Like My Sister Kate” (mx. 80403) / “Some of These Days” (mx. 80404)

 

Tpt: Chelsea Quealey  Roy Johnston

Tbn: Abe Lincoln  Ivan Johnston

Reeds: Sam Ruby, Bobby Davis, Adrian Rollini

Pno: Irving Brodsky  Jack Russin

Bjo: Tommy Felline

____________________

 

New York: April 14, 1927

“Muddy Water” (mx. 80730) / “The Wang Wang Blues” (mx. 80731) / “The Whisper Song” (mx. 80732) / “Arkansas Blues” (mx. 80733)

 

Tpt: Chelsea Quealey

Tbn: Abe Lincoln  [none listed]

Reeds: Sam Ruby, Bobby Davis, Adrian Rollini

Pno: Irving Brodsky  Jack Russin

Bjo / Gtr: Tommy Felline

Percussion: Herb Weil

____________________


New York: June 15, 1927

“Lazy Weather” (mx. 81015) / “Vo-Do-Do-De-O Blues” (mx. 81016) / “Ain’t That a Grand and Glorious Feeling?” (mx. 81017)

 

Tpt: Chelsea Quealey

Tbn: Al Philburn  Tommy Dorsey

Reeds: Bobby Davis, Sam Ruby, Adrian Rollini

Pno: Jack Russin

Bjo: Tommy Felline

Percussion: Herb Weil

Vocal: Ed Kirkeby

____________________

 

New York: August 10 and 12, 1927

August 10: “Clementine” (mx. 81207) / “Nothin’ Does It Like It Used to Do-Do-Do” (mx. 81208)

August 12: “I Left My Sugar Standing in the Rain” (mx. 81219; originally scheduled for August 10 session)

 

Tpt: Chelsea Quealey

Tbn: Al Philburn  [none listed]

Reeds: Bobby Davis, Sam Ruby, Adrian Rollini

Pno: Jack Russin

Bjo: Tommy Felline

Percussion: Herb Weil

Note: The vocalist (Beth Challis) was not on Kirkeby’s payroll.

____________________

New York: November 3, 1927

“Blue Baby, Why Are You Blue?” (mx. 81772) / “Make My Cot Where the Cot-Cot-Cotton Grows” (mx. 81773) / “Is She My Girl Friend?” (mx. 81774)

 

Tpt: Henry Levine, Chelsea Quealey

Tbn: Al Philburn

Reeds: Bob Fallon, Pete Pumiglio, Spencer Clark

Pno: Jack Russin

Bjo: Tommy Felline

Percussion: Herb Weil

Note: The vocalist (Les Reis) was not on Kirkeby’s payroll.

Discographic Update: Corrected Personnel for Gennett 1926–1927 “Vagabonds” (California Ramblers) Sessions, from Ed Kirkeby’s Payroll Books

We continue with our corrections to the undocumented (and thus, often very incorrect) personnel listings in Johnson & Shirley’s American Dance Bands on Films and Records, successor to Rust’s American Dance Band Discography.

The following listings, taken from Ed Kirkeby’s payroll books,  correct ADBFR’s speculative personnel for the California Ramblers’ 1926–1927 “Vagabonds” sessions at the Starr Piano Company’s Gennett studio in New York. Names in boldface are confirmed in the payroll books. Struck-out names are incorrect guesses that appear in ADBFR. Perhaps the most important correction to note is the absence of Tommy Dorsey on all of these records.

In addition to Ed Kirkeby’s “diaries” and payroll books (two separate sets of documents, which when merged provide a very complete picture of each session), we are using Perry Armagnac’s unpublished annotations, which were made with Mr. Kirkeby’s personal assistance in the early 1950s. At that time, Kirkeby was able to clear up some of the ambiguities in his files, which included providing full names for some of his lesser-known part-time musicians (generally, only last names were entered), and the instruments they played. In other cases, he was unable to recall full details; rather than guess (although in some cases the answers seem fairly obvious), we’ve listed those personnel as [?],  to avoid muddling the original data.

 

___________________________________________

New York: March 19, 1926

“Gimme a Little Kiss” (mxs. X-43) / “Could I? I Certainly Could (mx. X-44) / “I’d Climb the Highest Mountain” (mx. X-45)

 

Tpts: Chelsea Quealy, Frank Cush  Leo McConville, Roy Johnston

Tbn: Abe Lincoln  George Troup

Reeds: Sam Ruby, Bobby Davis, Arnold Brillhart, Adrian Rollini

Pno: Irving Brodsky  F. Fabian Storey

Bjo: Tommy Felline  [?]

Percussion: Stan King  Herb Weil

Unknown instrument(s): [?] Deacon, [?] Frink

Note: The vocalist (Arthur Fields) was not on EK’s payroll.

____________________

New York: August 19, 1926

“Looking at the World Thru’ Rose Colored Glasses” (mx. X-227) / “On the Riviera” (mx. X-228) / “The Birth of the Blues” (mx. X-229 — Rejected per Gennett ledger; remade by Willie Creager’s Orchestra on X-259*)

 

Tpts: Frank Cush  Chelsea Quealy, Roy Johnston

Tbn: Tommy Dorsey  George Troup

Reeds: Arnold Brillhart, Bobby Davis, Sam Ruby, Adrian Rollini

Pno: Irving Brodsky  Jack Russin

Bjo: Tommy Felline

Percussion: Herb Weil

Unknown instrument(s): [?] Stark

* Musicians’ pay was reduced proportionally (to two titles from three) because X-229 was rejected. ADBFR’s claim that X-229 appeared on Champion 15079 is unconfirmed. If you have the Ramblers’ version of this record and can supply confirming photo and audio evidence, please let us know.

Kirkeby paid himself $26.65 for unspecified services on this session.

____________________

 

New York: “Seeley — Starr,” January 14, 1927

“College Girls” (—) / “Sam, the Old Accordion Man” (—)

It is not certain that this was a California Ramblers session. It is listed only in Kirkeby’s logbook; no corresponding entry has been found in his payroll book or the Gennett ledgers. Although it’s tempting to speculate this refers to Blossom Seeley, we’ve so far found no evidence to support that.

 

_____________________

New York: May 2, 1927

“I’m Back in Love Again” (mx. GEX-635) / “Yes She Do — No She Don’t” (mx. GEX-636) / “Sluefoot” (mx. GEX-637)

 

Tpts: Frank CushChelsea Quealy

Tbn: Tommy Dorsey  Edward Lapp

Reeds: Arnold Brillhart, Bobby Davis, Bob Fallon, Sam Ruby, Adrian Rollini

Pno: Irving Brodsky  Jack Russin

Bjo: Tommy Felline

Percussion: Herb Weil

Unknown instrument(s): [?] Black

The Playlist • Earl Hines & his Orchestra (Chicago, 1929)

MSP_vic_V-38096-A

 

EARL HINES & HIS ORCHESTRA: Grand Piano Blues

Chicago: October 25, 1929 — Released December 20, 1929
Victor V-38096 (mx. BVE 57322 – 2)
The common Bluebird reissue of this recording used an anemic-sounding dubbed master; here’s “Grand Piano” as originally issued, before RCA’s engineers wrung the life out of it (albeit a bit noisy, having spent many years in a Nebraska barn before being recently rescued).

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EARL HINES & HIS ORCHESTRA: Chicago Rhythm

Chicago: February 22, 1929 — Released April 19, 1929
Victor V-38042 (mx. BVE 50511 – 2)

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EARL HINES & HIS ORCHESTRA: Beau-Koo Jack

Chicago: February 15, 1929
Victor unissued take (mx. BVE 48887 -1)
From a c. 1960s custom vinyl pressing from the original stamper. Take 2 was issued on Victor V-38043 (released April 19, 1929)

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Discographic data are from the original RCA files, courtesy of John R. Bolig. Details of all of the Victor V-38000, V-38500, and other Victor race records are available in John’s mammoth Victor Black Label Discography, Vol. 4, available from Mainspring Press.

 

The Playlist • Dick Justice (1929)

MSP_bwk-395a

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DICK JUSTICE: Brown Skin Blues

Chicago: May 20, 1929
Brunswick 336 (mx. C 3515 – )

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DICK JUSTICE: Henry Lee

Chicago: May 21, 1929
Brunswick 367 (mx. C 3521 – )

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DICK JUSTICE: Cocaine

Chicago: May 20, 1929
Brunswick 395 (mx. C 3516 – )

Selected takes are not noted in the Brunswick ledger nor visible in the pressings. “Cocaine” is a word-for-word cover of the Luke Jordan song, which Jordan recorded two years earlier for Victor. Whether Justice (a white performer from West Virginia) was in some way associated with Jordan (a black performer from central Virginia), or simply copied it from the record, remains a tantalizing mystery.

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The Playlist • Gennett in Birmingham, Alabama (Summer 1927)

MSP_gnt-birmingham-composit

A sampling from Gennett’s summer 1927 trip to Birmingham, Alabama. A temporary studio was set up in the Starr Piano Company store at 1820 Third Avenue. It was an exceptionally productive stay from a historical (if not commercial) standpoint, preserving a rich cross-section of Birmingham’s musical heritage.

MSP_gnt-ledger_770-772

Many discographies show incorrect recording dates for these sessions because their compilers misunderstood the Gennett ledger sheets. The dates given in the ledgers (in the “From N.Y.” column, which was used regardless of the actual origination point) are those on which the masters were received at the Richmond, Indiana, facility. Masters — the original waxes (indicated by a “W” in the ledgers) rather than metal parts, in the case of the Birmingham sessions — were shipped in batches by rail, so the actual recording dates, with allowance for packing, transport, etc., are probably at least a week prior to the Richmond receipt dates.

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REV. J. F. FOREST & CONGREGATION:
Revival for Sinners

Birmingham: August 1927 — Mx. receipt date not entered (c. August 29)
Silvertone 5143 (Gennett mx. GEX 849 – A)
Estimated receipt date based on entered dates for other mx’s

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JAYBIRD COLEMAN (as Rabbits Foot Williams):
Man Trouble Blues

Birmingham: July–August 1927 — Mx. received in Richmond August 5
Champion 15379 (Gennett mx. GEX 771 – [replacing rejected GEX 694])
The pianist is not credited in the Gennett ledger

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GEORGE H. TREMER: Spirit of ’49

Birmingham: July–August 1927 — Mx. received in Richmond August 8
Champion 15436 (Gennett mx. GEX 779 – A)

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FRANK BUNCH & HIS FUZZY WUZZIES (as New Orleans Strutters): Fourth Avenue Stomp

Birmingham: August 1927 — Mx. receipt date not entered (c. August 20)
Champion 15398 (Gennett mx. GEX 832 – A)
Estimated receipt date based on entered dates for other mx’s

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TRIANGLE HARMONY BOYS (as Alabama Harmony Boys): Chicken Supper Strut

Birmingham: August 1927 — Mx. receipt date not entered (c. August 20)
Champion 15398 (Gennett mx. GEX 838 – A)
Estimated receipt date based on entered dates for other mx’s

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DUNK RENDELMAN & HIS ORCHESTRA (as Down Home Serenaders): Mean Dog Blues

Birmingham: August 1927 — Mx. receipt date not entered (c. August 29)
Champion 15399 (Gennett mx. GEX 852 – A)
Estimated receipt date based on entered dates for other mx’s

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EVA QUARTETTE (W. J. Smith, organ; as Ellington Sacred Quartette): You Can’t Make a Monkey Out of Me

Birmingham: August 1927 — Mx. received in Richmond August 11
Challenge 404 (Gennett mx. GEX 792 – A)
An anti-evolution song. This is one of the few Birmingham sides that is relatively easy to find, appearing on seven different labels under various names.

Playlist and Discographical Update • A Little Coon-Sanders Deception (1928–1929)

MSP_bwy-1227b

Broadway pressing from NYRL mx. 20924 (with Joe Sanders’ last name
misspelled),
originally issued on Paramount 20668

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A bit of “hide the band” activity, while we’re on the subject of the Coon-Sanders Orchestra. In November 1928, they recorded four titles for Paramount at the Marsh Laboratories, obviously on the sly since they were exclusive to Victor at the time. Two sides were released under the suspicious-sounding “Manhattan Entertainers” name. The other two were credited to the “Castle Farms Serenaders,” which had at least a grain of truth, since the band  played on occasion at Cincinnati’s Castle Farms .

Three were titles that the band never recorded for Victor, but Joe Sander’s own “Tennessee Lazy” was an exception. Three months later (by which time the Paramount version probably had already been released), the band would record the tune for Victor under its  own name. Aside from the addition of Joe Sander’s vocal, and the obvious differences in tempo (due partly to slightly different recording speeds) and recorded-sound quality, the performances are virtually identical. No “cover” band could have produced such a perfect sound-alike, especially since the Victor version had not yet been recorded and thus could not have been copied.

Brian Rust somehow missed the correlation in Jazz Records 6th Edition, listing the “Castle Farms Serenaders” on this session as an entirely unknown band, although he did credit the vocal on the reverse (a straightforward reading of “High Up on a Hilltop”) to “Franks Wells,” which was actually just a pseudonym used to cover several different singers on Broadway over the years. The attribution doesn’t appear on our copy of Broadway 1227, although we’ve heard it does appear on others.  American Dance Bands on Record and Film erroneously credits the record to a Bill Haid group, with no reason given (banjoist Haid had been in and out of the Coon-Sanders Orchestra several times, but by this time he had his own band, a so-so outfit that was not up to Coon-Sanders’ level on any recordings we’ve heard so far). Earlier Paramount issues under the “Castle Farms” name still bear further investigation; the undocumented personnel listed by Rust for those sessions, although not disclosed as such, appear to be purely speculative.

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COON-SANDERS ORCHESTRA (as Castle Farms Serenaders): Tennessee Lazy

Chicago (Marsh Laboratories): November 1928
Broadway 1227 (mx. 20924 – 2)
Paramount release: c. January 1929
Broadway release: Spring 1929 Montgomery Ward list

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COON-SANDERS ORCHESTRA (Joe Sanders, director and vocal): Tennessee Lazy

Chicago (Victor Lab, 925 N. Michigan Ave.): February 12, 1929
Victor 21939 (mx. BVE 48880 – 2)
Released: May 17, 1929 — Deleted: 1931

The Playlist • Coon-Sanders Original Night Hawks Orchestra (1925–1929)

MSP_coon-sanders_composite.

COON-SANDERS ORIGINAL NIGHT HAWKS ORCHESTRA (Carleton A. Coon and Joe Sanders, vocal):
I’m Gonna Charleston Back to Charleston

Camden, NJ: July 13, 1925
Victor 19727 (mx. BVE 32768 – 4)
Released: August 21, 1926 — Deleted: 1927

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COON-SANDERS ORIGINAL NIGHT HAWKS ORCHESTRA: Brainstorm

Chicago (Webster Hotel): December 8, 1926
Victor 20390 (mx. BVE 37216 – 2)
Released: January 28, 1927 — Deleted: 1928

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COON-SANDERS ORIGINAL NIGHT HAWKS ORCHESTRA (Leroy Shield, director):
Roodles

Chicago (Victor Lab, 952 N. Michigan Ave.): June 25, 1927
Victor 20785 (mx. BVE 39065 – 3)
Released: August 19, 1927 — Deleted: 1934

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COON-SANDERS ORCHESTRA (Carleton A. Coon, vocal): Bless You! Sister

Chicago (Victor Lab, 952 N. Michigan Ave.): December 12, 1928
Victor 21895 (mx. BVE 48726 – 2)
Regional Release: May 1929 — Deleted: 1931

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COON-SANDERS NIGHTHAWKS: The Maytag Frolic, Parts 5 & 6
..Bless You! Sister (Carleton A. Coon, vocal)
..Kansas City Kity (Joe Sanders, vocal)
..What a Girl! What a Night! (Joe Sanders, vocal)

Chicago (623–633 S. Wabash Avenue, 6th Floor): February 28, 1929
Brunswick unnumbered specials (mxs. XC 3024-A / XC 3025-A)

Rust’s Jazz Records shows a recording date of January 17, 1929, in error (the correct date, shown above, is from the Brunswick ledgers). This program was produced by Brunswick’s transcription division for its National Radio Advertising Company affiliate. In late 1928 or early 1929, Brunswick installed dual cutting lathes that allowed uninterrupted recording across sides, with “Kansas City Kitty” being a good example. It was split between two 12″ masters, but the break is noticeable only as a faint change in the level of surface noise. The dual lathes were also used in commercial record production, providing duplicate wax masters that could be destructively sampled on the spot, while sparing the originals. (Dubbing courtesy of the late Jacob Brown.)

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Victor data are from John Bolig’s inspection of the original Victor documentation in the Sony Archive, New York. The Shield attribution on “Roodles” is missing from Jazz Records, American Dance Bands, and derivative works, but is confirmed in the Victor files (Shield was a Victor house conductor).

The Playlist • Armand J. Piron’s New Orleans Orchestra / Ida G. Brown (1923–1925)

piron-columbia

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ARMAND J. PIRON’S NEW ORLEANS ORCHESTRA (Armand J. Piron and Charles Bocage, vocal):
Kiss Me Sweet

New York: December 1923
Okeh 40021 (mx. S 72133 – D)

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ARMAND J. PIRON’S NEW ORLEANS ORCHESTRA:
Mama’s Gone, Goodbye

New York: December 11, 1923
Victor 19233 (mx. B 29122 – 2)

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ARMAND J. PIRON’S NEW ORLEANS ORCHESTRA:
Sud Bustin’ Blues

New York: December 21, 1923
Columbia 14007-D (mx. 81435 – 3)

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ARMAND J. PIRON’S NEW ORLEANS ORCHESTRA:
Ghost of the Blues

New York: February 15, 1924
Columbia 99-D (mx. 81569-3)

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ARMAND J. PIRON’S NEW ORLEANS ORCHESTRA:
Red Man Blues

New Orleans: March 25, 1925
Victor 19646 (mx. B 32121 – 3)

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IDA G. BROWN & HER BOYS: Kiss Me Sweet

New York (Independent Recording Laboratories): February 1924
Banner 1343 (mx. 5430 – 2)
The accompanists are believed to have been members of Piron’s Orchestra, based on aural and circumstantial evidence; the original Plaza-IRL documentation for this period no longer exists.

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Tales from the Columbia Vaults: The Unauthorized Vinyl “Test” Pressings (1960)

(This article was originally posted on September 17, 2012. We are reposting it, with some minor revisions, in response to many requests.)

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victor_re-pressing

A c. 1960s custom vinyl pressing of Duke Ellington’s 1931 “Creole Rhapsody” (Victor). Obsolete labels were sometimes flipped over and used as blanks on these pressings; this example uses an old Yorkville label from the late 1930s.

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We often see modern, blank-labeled vinyl “test” pressings of very old recordings on auction lists. They’re original-stamper pressings, usually of unissued or extremely rare material, and the surface quality is generally superb. Collectors have long been curious about the origin and legality of these pressings. We recently discovered the answer among the late Bill Bryant’s papers (at least, as far as the Columbia-related pressings are concerned) which includes copies of the late William Moran’s voluminous correspondence with various collectors and dealers.

The “inside job” we detail below was not unique. Someone within Decca, for instance, made large numbers of unauthorized vinyl pressings of rare 1920s jazz material from Gennett and Brunswick-Vocalion masters at around the same time the CBS insiders were pulling unauthorized “test” pressings from old masters by the score. The same happened at RCA, although that company (unlike CBS) allowed such pressings to be ordered legitimately through its Custom Products department, for a rather stiff fee. In addition, during the 1950s and 1960s many new pressings from previously unissued material were pulled at RCA in connection with its “X” and “Vintage” reissue programs. Although supposedly intended for internal use by those involved in the projects, a substantial number seem to have been pressed, based on how many have since made their way into auction lists and collectors’ hands.

This, however, is the first time that such detailed information on unauthorized pressings has surfaced from a company insider. Illegal? Certainly — But whether anyone involved was a villain (other than perhaps the record companies) depends on your point of view. Our take is that those involved performed a valuable service in preserving important historic material that was subsequently trashed and written off by irresponsible corporate owners.

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In October 1960, a disgruntled CBS employee (who we’ll call “X”) contacted Bill Moran to alert him that the Columbia Records division was house-cleaning its Bridgeport, Connecticut plant and was planning to scrap many of its masters, including its holdings of Fonotipia and other imported recordings, the E- series foreign and ethnic material, and all of the early 16” radio transcriptions.

X’s letters to Moran provide a rare insider’s look at exactly what remained in Bridgeport in 1960. He reported that some “ancient stuff” (including cylinders, cylinder-phonograph parts, and display-model phonographs) still existed but had recently been “removed to some other part of the plant.” The earliest recording files had not survived, and there had been no effort to copy or microfilm what remained; in addition, the files had recently been placed off-limits to outsiders and employees, other than company librarian Helene Chmura, and photocopying was forbidden. The master-scrapping was already under way by the time X wrote to Moran — He reported that the metal parts were being hauled out in bucket loaders, ground up, and sold to a scrap dealer by the ton.

X’s formal recommendation that some of this material be preserved was ignored by management, so in late October he sent a list of endangered masters to Moran, with the suggestion that Moran ask Stanford University to intervene, and hinting that in the meantime he could supply Moran with unauthorized vinyl pressings of virtually anything in the vaults — He claimed he was already doing just that for some Columbia employees. The process is documented in an exchange of letters between X and Moran that began on October 31, 1960. On November 11 he wrote to Moran,

I have been securing test pressings without authority for the past two months. I had to “thread my way” until I could enlist help. Luckily he [the test pressman] is cooperative… I have been limiting my operation to twice a week and taking out parcels only every other week. One week I took out 16 [parcels], last week 19… I have managed to get a few humans in the plant (there are a few) to break regulations for me… I will attempt, over a period of time, to secure for you the materials you desire. These, if I get them, will be gratis.

The process was a complicated one, and it involved many Columbia employees at a time when (according to X) worker morale was at a low ebb. To make the early stampers compatible with a modern press, the metal and composition backings had to be removed and replaced, and new holes had  to be drilled in the stampers, which were then forwarded to the polishing department, from which they were sent to the test pressman. While all of this was going on under management’s nose, X was assuring Moran that he could even have new metal stampers plated for him, if desired.

Moran’s want-list initially included only early operatics, but was soon expanded to include political speeches from Nation’s Forum, rare personal recordings by the likes of Irving Berlin and Booker T. Washington, and even one of the 1908 vertical-cut disc tests (an idea that Columbia ended up not pursuing commercially).

X soon upped the frequency and pressing quantities of his clandestine runs. Many copies were handed out as favors to Columbia employees who were in on the activity, including Helene Chmura, the archive’s highly esteemed librarian. Chmura knew of X’s activities and had warned him to be careful, but reportedly she was happy to accept a group of custom Lotte Lehmann pressings. In November, X told Moran he was looking into ways of supplying him with copies of the restricted files that were in Chmura’s charge.

On November 16, X wrote to Moran, “Last Friday I took out 18 tests, including duplicates, in an open parcel… On Monday Bill [the chief of security] suggested that I not take out so many so often.” He went on to boast,

I have the run of the plant and have taken full advantage of it — women in duplicating will make photostats, Helene will make photocopies; the polisher will prepare masters for pressings… The Chief of Security Police allows me to make off with the records; the librarian’s files are at my disposal.

X promised Moran even larger shipments of the unauthorized pressings in a letter dated November 23:

I’ll send you a ton of pressings if I can discover how this can be arranged… One of the chaps in the Methods & Procedures Office this afternoon told me that he can smuggle pressings out for me if I cannot continue my present methods. These boys have briefcases which never are examined by the bulldogs. I have been furnishing two of these M&P men with records made to order.

A day later, X wrote to Moran to update him on his secret copying of the recording files, reporting that he was “lifting it right out from under [Helene Chmura’s] nose.” And that’s the final letter in our “X” file.

© 2016 Mainspring Press LLC.

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The Playlist • The Best of Fess Williams & his Royal Flush Orchestra (1927)

MSP_williams-fess_composite

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FESS WILLIAMS’ ROYAL FLUSH ORCHESTRA:
White Ghost Shivers

New York: February 3, 1927 (A.M. session, Brunswick Studio – Room #1)
Vocalion 1085
Three takes were made (E4503, E4504, E4505); the selected take is not shown on our pressing. The recording date is given in error as February 2 in Rust’s Jazz Records.

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FESS WILLIAMS’ ROYAL FLUSH ORCHESTRA:
Variety Stomp

New York: March 28, 1927 (P.M. session, Room #1)
Brunswick 3532 (mx. 22361, renumbered from Vocalion mx. E4769)

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FESS WILLIAMS’ ROYAL FLUSH ORCHESTRA:
Phantom Blues

New York: March 28, 1927 (P.M. session, Room #1)
Brunswick 3532 (mx. E22366, renumbered from Vocalion mx. E4774)

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FESS WILLIAMS’ ROYAL FLUSH ORCHESTRA:
Alligator Crawl

New York: June 15, 1927 (P.M. session, Room #2)
Brunswick 3589 (mx. E23633)
Arrangement by Fess Williams, per Brunswick files

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FESS WILLIAMS’ ROYAL FLUSH ORCHESTRA:
Ozark Blues

New York: June 15, 1927 (P.M. session, Room #2)
Brunswick 3589 (mx. E23638)
Arrangement by Fess Williams, per Brunswick files

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FESS WILLIAMS’ ROYAL FLUSH ORCHESTRA:
Number 10

New York: June 24, 1927 (P.M. session, Room #1)
Brunswick 3596 (mx. E23747)
Arrangement by Fess Williams, per Brunswick files