Latest Additions to the Phono-Cut Discography

Latest Additions to the Phono-Cut Discography

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Thanks to Robert Johannesson (Kristianstad, Sweden), we now have additional details for the following issues in The Phono-Cut Discography:

 

Phono-Cut 5182:

I Rosens Doft = side A (mx. 1374 [00])

Trollhättan = side B (mx. 1375 [0])

 

Phono-Cut 5253 (previously unconfirmed issue):

Fogeln’s Visa = side A (mx. 1525 [00])

Stephanie = side B (mx. 1446 [0]; catalog number 5209, on which this also appears, is also in the wax)

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These and other recently received additions will be incorporated in our next full revision of the discography (V.3), tentatively scheduled for early November. Our thanks for all who have taken the time to respond.

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It now appears almost certain that the “0” characters following many of the master numbers are take indicators. If so, that raises the question of whether “0” indicates take 1, or the absence of “0” indicates take 1 (in which case, “0” would be take 2, “00” take 3, etc. — similar to Gennett’s use of no letter for take 1, “A” for take 2, etc.). The relative rarity of “000” markings suggests the latter, but that is still just a guess at this point.

Browse the Mainspring Press Online Reference Library for more discographies, all free to download for personal, non-commercial use.

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Forgotten Black Musicians • Wendell P. Talbert

Forgotten Black Musicians • Wendell P. Talbert

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ROSA HENDERSON (Wendell P. Talbert, piano)
Good Woman’s Blues

New York: May 24, 1923
Victor 19084 (mx. B 28026 -2)

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ROSA HENDERSON (Wendell P. Talbert, piano)
Good Woman’s Blues

New York: May 24, 1923
Victor 19084 (mx. B 28027 -2)

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Like Noble Sissle, with whom he was associated off-and-on for many years, Wendell Talbert was largely a creature of the theater. Unlike Sissle, he left behind only a handful of issued recordings, and only in an accompanying role. As a result, he’s been largely overlooked by collectors and historians.

The earliest substantive reference we’ve found to Wendell Phillip (or Philips, depending on the account) Talbert shows him as a member of the Southern Jubilee Singers and Players in January 1912. This was a traveling organization that specialized in old-time “plantation” songs, traditional spirituals, and other fare that likely was selected at least in part for its appeal to white audiences.

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Talbert as tenor, cellist, and pianist with the Southern Jubilee Singers and Players (Bismarck [North Dakota] Tribune, January  27, 1912)

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By 1914, Talbert was a featured performer with William A. Hann’s Jubilee Singers, a group of “seven cultured ladies and gentlemen” whose offerings ran from “refined and wholesome humor” to spirituals and grand opera. Its members included soprano Florence Cole, who Talbert married in the same year. At about that time, Noble Sissle joined the troupe, initially filling in for Talbert on occasion, based upon some published programs from the period. Their paths would continue to cross for the next four decades.

.Wendell Talbert and Florence Cole-Talbert with Hann’s Jubilee Singers (Hutchinson [Kansas] Gazette, October 17, 1914)

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The Talberts divorced at some point, although the date remains unclear. One secondary source cites 1915, but news reports as late as 1917 continued to state that the couple were married. The latest such report we’ve located so far, in the Xenia [Ohio] Daily Gazette for May 24, 1917, refers to Cole-Talbert’s “talented husband, Prof. Wendell Talbert.” However, she continued to use Cole-Talbert as her professional name, perhaps leading to some confusion in the press.

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Florence Cole-Talbert is remembered primarily for her Black Swan recordings. She and Wendell had divorced by the time those recordings were made, but she continued to use her married name in stage work.

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Talbert appears to have left Hann in 1918 or 1919, when mentions of him vanish from the press. At some point in the early 1920s, he made the transition from old-time tunes and spirituals to jazz and blues, albeit of a rather tame sort. In July 1921, it was reported that he would be writing for the Chamberlain Company, a newly launched music publisher in Detroit. Anecdotal reports credit him with coming up with the name for Sissle & Blake’s “Shuffle Along,” and conducting the pit orchestra in one of the show’s touring companies, but those stories remain to be confirmed.

In 1923, Talbert resurfaced as the piano accompanist on a few records by vaudeville-blues singers Rosa Henderson (Victor) and Lethia Hill (Vocalion). His two recordings with Henderson were released in Victor’s first attempt at a race-record series:

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Victor’s first attempt at a race-record series, July 1923. Sissle’s and Talbert’s sessions were held a day apart. Sissle by this time was a major star, and it’s tempting to speculate that he might have arranged for Talbert to record for Victor.

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By late 1925, Talbert had remarried and was touring in vaudeville with his Chocolate Fiends, a large revue that starred Alethia Hill. In November of that year, he accompanied two sides by comedian Billy King on Okeh. His orchestra made a test recording of “Deep Henderson” for Brunswick of October 28, 1926, which unfortunately was not approved for issue.

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Talbert and company on the road (Indianapolis, December 1925)

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Talbert remarried in 1926 and publicly credited new wife Hallie for her help and inspiration. He continued to tour with the Chocoalte Fiends into the late 1920s, but made no further issued recordings that we know of.

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Pittsburgh Courier (October 2, 1926)

Pittsburgh Courier (October 9, 1926)

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Pittsburgh Courier (September 15, 1927)

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In the early 1930s, Talbert returned to his roots with his Dusky Troubadours, a choir that specialized in the same sort of material he had performed with Hann’s Jubilee Singers two decades earlier. The group broadcast over radio station WOR (Newark, New Jersey) on occasion. By 1934, Talbert had augmented the choir with an eighteen-piece orchestra.

 

Talbert with the USO during World War II (Louisville Courier-Journal, September 24, 1944)

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During World War II, Talbert served as musical advisor to the Colored USO of Central New Jersey. In July 1950, Talbert rejoined Noble Sissle, probably for the last time, in a fund-raiser for the New York Heart Association. He died in the early 1950s.

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Before There Were Victor Records…..

… There Was The Victor Record

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Now, we’re certainly not claiming that Eldridge Johnson swiped the name for his company from this once-famous newspaper in Victor, Colorado. But The Victor Record was founded in 1895 (six years before the Victor Talking Machine Company), and its reporting on the goings-on in Victor, Colorado — one of the richest gold-mining regions in the world at that time — attracted plenty of attention in the national and international press.

Victor at the start of the twentieth century was a lively place, to put it mildly, a workingman’s town perched atop a vast fortune in gold ore (the Gold Coin Mine, one of the richest, sat just two blocks from the commercial district). The good citizens celebrated July 4,1899, by blowing the top off an adjacent mountain with five tons of dynamite, an explosion that reportedly was felt for eighty miles and made international headlines:

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.Cardiff [Wales] Western Mail (July 7, 1899)

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Perhaps not surprisingly, much of Victor burned to the ground a little over a month later, again making headlines around the country:

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Wilmington [North Carolina] Morning Star (August 22, 1899)

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.The town was rebuilt quickly — this time in brick and stone, replacing the wooden structures that had originally been tossed up during the early days of the gold rush. Along with Cripple Creek (its bigger sister just up the road), Victor was a popular destination for celebrities at the turn of the century, including Theodore Roosevelt. Unfortunately for Mr. Roosevelt, his visit coincided with a period of open hostilities between pro- and anti-union factions, and he found himself threatened by an angry mob in Victor:

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Chickasa [Kansas] Daily Express (September 28, 1900)

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And lest you think whacko conspiracy theories and cries of “Fake News!” are anything new, consider one newspaper’s spurious take on the “alleged” riot:

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Stockton [California] Evening Mail (October 1, 1900)

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So, did Eldridge Johnson get the idea to name his company “Victor” from Victor? Pretty unlikely. But then again, the notion is no sillier than some of the other Victor naming myths we’ve heard…

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