Collector’s Corner • Some November 2019 Additions — Lucille Hegamin, Lottie Beaman, Five Harmaniacs, Louis Armstrong with Luis Russell, Jimmie Davis, Speckled Red, Feodor Chaliapin

Collector’s Corner • Some November 2019 Additions
Lucille Hegamin, Lottie Beaman, Five Harmaniacs, Louis Armstrong with Luis Russell, Jimmie Davis, Speckled Red, Feodor Chaliapin

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Eclectic’s the word for our November additions to the collection — Enjoy!

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LUCILLE HEGAMIN & HER BLUE FLAME SYNCOPATORS: You’ll Want My Love  (EE– )

New York (probably New York Recording Laboratories): Released June 1921
Arto 9063 (no visible mx. number)

Hegamin never produced another hit to rival “Arkansas Blues,” and her sales seemed to decline with each subsequent Arto release, if the number if surviving copies is any indication. Based on aural and physical characteristics, this master was recorded by NYRL (Paramount), one of at least a half-dozen studios from which Arto commissioned its masters, per data in Ed Kirkeby’s 1921–1923 logs; for details, see American Record Company and Producers, 1888–1950.

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LOTTIE BEAMAN: Honey Blues  (V+, with worn label)

Chicago (probably Rodeheaver Recording Laboratories): c. February 1924
Paramount 12201 (mx. 1695 – 1)
Accompanied by Miles and Milas Pruitt, as The Pruett Twins (sic).

This seems an opportune spot to debunk the old tale that Marsh Laboratories recorded Paramount’s acoustic Chicago masters (the problem being, the best Marsh researchers have never found any evidence that Marsh made acoustic recordings). Paramount house pianist and session arranger Lovie Austin recalled in a 1950 interview that these sessions actually were held in Homer Rodeheaver’s studio (a for-hire operation that at one point employed Vocalion’s former recording engineer), and aural characteristics support her recollection. See ARCP for more details.

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FIVE HARMANIACS: What Makes My Baby Cry?  (E)

New York: February 8, 1927
Victor 20507 (mx. BVE 37750 – 2)
Walter Howard (speaking); no other personnel listed in the Victor files

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FIVE HARMANIACS: It Takes a Good Woman (To Keep a Good Man at Home)  (EE–)

New York: February 8, 1927
Victor 20507 (mx. BVE 37750 – 2)
No personnel listed in the Victor files

Headed by Texas entertainer Claude Shugart, the Five Harmaniacs defy easy categorization. They started out singing cowboy ballads in a vaudeville act titled “Round-Up Tunes,” but in 1926 they headed off in a new direction that caught the attention of the record companies. Now billing themselves as  “A Genuine Musical Novelty,” they began featuring  jazz- and blues-inflected tunes in a style inspired by southern jug and skiffle bands (Brunswick even released two of their titles in its race-record series). But they continued to wear their cowboy outfits on national tours, and sometimes reverted to their original repertoire when playing in and around Texas.

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LUIS RUSSELL’S ORCHESTRA with LOUIS ARMSTRONG (as LOUIS ARMSTRONG & HIS ORCHESTRA): Rockin’ Chair  (E– to V+)

New York:  December 13, 1929
Okeh 8756  (mx. W 403496 – C)
Louis Armstrong (vocal); Hoagy Carmichael (speaking)

In December 1929, Armstrong began fronting Luis Russell’s New York band. After touring the mid-Atlantic region, Armstrong and the Russell band made a triumphant return to Chicago in February 1930, where The Chicago Defender reported, “such an ovation as was given him has not been seen in these parts for a long time.” The unfortunate inclusion here of Hoagy Carmichael (uncredited on the labels, but confirmed in the recording files) was a record-company gimmick, the beginning of a drive to move Armstrong and his records into the mainstream.

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RUFUS PERRYMAN (as SPECKLED RED): Do the Georgia  (E)

Aurora, Illinois (Leland Hotel): December 17, 1938
Bluebird B-7985 (mx. BS 030840 – 1)
Rufus Perryman (vocal, piano); Robert Lee McCoy (guitar); Willie Hatcher (mandolin)

The curious choice of Aurora, Illinois, as an RCA recording location was made in 1937, after the Chicago chapter of the American Federation of Musicians targeted the company for making substandard payments to its race-record artists. Rather than pay decently, RCA moved just beyond the reach of the Chicago local. The company slipped back into Chicago in 1939, only to be threatened with revocation of its AFM recording license if it didn’t begin paying union scale.

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JIMMIE DAVIS: Bear Cat Mama from Horner’s Corners  (V++)

Memphis Auditorium: November 29, 1930
Montgomery Ward M-4283 (Victor mx. BVE 64760 – 2)

1934 original-stamper reissue of Victor 23517. The guitarists are unlisted in the Victor ledger. Tony Russell’s Country Music Records suggests Oscar Woods (guitar) and Ed Schaffer (steel guitar), which if correct, would make this one of the very few racially integrated country-music recordings of the period. Davis went on to make his name with a more sappy sort of country music that included his own “You Are My Sunshine,” the enormous popularity of which helped propel him to the governorship of Louisiana in 1944.

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FEODOR CHALIAPIN & FLORENCE AUSTRAL: Faust – Church Scene (complete in two parts)  (E)

Hayes, Middlesex, England: October 26, 1925
His Master’s Voice D.B.899 (mxs. Cc 7067- 2 / Cc 7075 – 1)
Albert Coates, conductor

From Chaliapin’s first electrical recording session. This was his second issued recording of the Church Scene, the first having been made in Moscow in 1910 with soprano Maria Michailowa.

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