The Playlist • Mississippi Sheiks (1930, 1934)

MSP_OK-8807-403806

The Mississippi Sheiks were Walter Vinson (guitar and vocal; also spelled “Vincson” or “Vincent” at times, but Vinson is correct, according to the artist himself), with the Chatmon (a.k.a. Chatman) folks in various combinations, including Lonnie (violin and vocal), Bo (better known in solo work as “Bo Carter,” vocal and guitar) and Sam (vocal, violin, and guitar). None of the inspected recording files, other than those for the final three Bluebird sessions, list exact personnel.

.

MISSISSIPPI SHEIKS: Stop and Listen Blues

Shreveport, Louisiana: February 17, 1930
Okeh 8807 (mx. W 403806 – A)

.

MISSISSIPPI SHEIKS (as Walter Jacobs and Lonnie Carter):
The Jazz Fiddler

Shreveport, Louisiana: February 17, 1930
Okeh 45436 (mx. W 403804 – B)
Issued in Okeh’s white country-music series.

.

MISSISSIPPI SHEIKS (as Walter Jacobs and the Carter Brothers): That’s It

San Antonio, Texas: June 10, 1930
Okeh 45482 (mx. W 404136 – A)
Issued in Okeh’s white country-music series.

.

MISSISSIPPI SHEIKS: Somebody’s Got to Help Me [sic]

San Antonio (Texas Hotel): March 26, 1934 — Released October 3, 1934
Bluebird B-5659 (mx. BVE-82607– 1)

The Playlist • Memphis Minnie, with Kansas Joe and Bumble Bee Slim (1929–1936)

MSP_mccoys-voc-1576

 

LIZZIE DOUGLAS & JOE McCOY (as Kansas Joe & Memphis Minnie): Goin’ Back to Texas

New York: June 18, 1929
Columbia 14455-D (mx. W 148709 – 2)

.

LIZZIE DOUGLAS & JOE McCOY (as Kansas Joe & Memphis Minnie): She Wouldn’t Give Me None

Memphis: February 20, 1930
Vocalion 1576 (mx. MEM 732 – )

.

LIZZIE DOUGLAS (as Memphis Minnie, with uncredited pianist):
Dirty Mother for You

Chicago: January 10, 1935
Mx. C 9641 – A
From a c. 1960 blank-label vinyl pressing from the original stamper. This recording was issued commercially in 1935 on Decca 7048.

.

AMOS EASTON & LIZZIE DOUGLAS (as Bumble Bee Slim & Memphis Minnie, with uncredited others): New Orleans Stop Time

Chicago: February 6, 1936
Vocalion 03197 (mx. C 1227 – 2)

 

A Gallery of 1898 Recording Artists

These extracts are from an August 1898 Phonoscope feature, “Gallery of Talent Employed for Making Records” (entries without photographs are not shown).

All of the artists pictured were active into the early 1900s, and far beyond in many cases, but Russell Hunting and Steve Porter had the longest and most distinguished recording-industry careers.  In addition to his prolific recording activities, Hunting was the editor of The Phonoscope (the industry’s first trade journal) in the 1890s, and he was still active in the later 1920s as American Pathé’s technical director.

Stephen Carl (Steve) Porter spent several years abroad in the early 1900s, including a stint as a recording engineer with the Nicole company, for which he made ethnic recordings in India and Burma. Upon his return to the U.S. he resumed recording (often in a stereotypical “dumb Irish” role that belied his brilliance), organized and managed the Rambler Minstrels (a popular recording and for-hire act that featured Billy Murray), and successfully filed for patents on various devices, including the Port-O-Phone, an early hearing aid. His activities are covered in detail in Steve Porter: Global Entrepreneur, on the Mainspring Press website.

 

MSP_PS-artists_aug-1898

The Playlist • “Yellow Dog Blues,” Four Very Different Ways (1919–1934)

MSP_smith-columbia-14075-D

.

JOSEPH C. SMITH’S ORCHESTRA, Featuring HARRY RADERMAN & HIS LAUGHING TROMBONE: Yellow Dog Blues — Medley Fox Trot, introducing “Hooking Cow Blues”

New York: October 1, 1919 — Released December 1919 (Deleted 1926)
Victor 18618 (mx. B 23282 – 1)

.

BESSIE SMITH (acc: Fletcher Henderson’s Hot Six):
Yellow Dog Blues

New York: May 6, 1925
Columbia 14075-D (mx. W 140586 – 1)

.

DUKE ELLINGTON & HIS ORCHESTRA: Yellow Dog Blues

New York: June 25, 1928
Brunswick 3987 (mx. E 27771 – A or B)
The selected take (of two made) is not indicated in the Brunswick files or on inspected pressings.

.

MEMPHIS JUG BAND: Rukus Juice and Chittlin’

Chicago: November 8, 1934
Okeh mx. C 801 – 1
From a c. 1960s vinyl pressing from the original stamper. This recording was issued commercially on Okeh 8955, as part of the final group of Okeh race releases made before the 8000 series was scuttled.

.

The Playlist • Moses Mason / Red Hot Old Mose (Paramount, 1928)

MSP_pmt-12702-B

.

REV. MOSES MASON: Go Wash in the Beautiful Stream

Chicago (Marsh Laboratories): c. January 1928
Paramount 12702 (mx. 20291 – 1)

.

REV. MOSES MASON: John the Baptist

Chicago (Marsh Laboratories): c. January 1928
Paramount 12702 (mx. 20290 – 2)

.

MOSES MASON (as RED HOT OLD MOSE): Shrimp Man

Chicago (Marsh Laboratories): c. January 1928
Paramount 12605 (mx. 20303 – 3)

 

The Playlist • Johnny Dunn (Featuring Edith Wilson and Jelly Roll Morton), 1922–1928

MSP_dunn-j_composite

 .

JOHNNY DUNN’S ORIGINAL JAZZ HOUNDS:
Hallelujah Blues

New York: February 14, 1923
Columbia A3939 (mx. 80859 – 3)

.

EDITH WILSON AND THE ORIGINAL JAZZ HOUNDS:
Wicked Blues

New York: January 20, 1922
Columbia A3558 (mx. 80150 – 4)

.

EDITH WILSON WITH JOHNNY DUNN’S ORIGINAL JAZZ HOUNDS: What Do You Care? (What I Do)

New York: July 13, 1922
Columbia A3674 (mx. 80450 – 4)

.

JOHNNY DUNN & HIS BAND [Jelly Roll Morton, piano]: Sergeant Dunn’s Bugle Call Blues

New York: March 13, 1928
Columbia 14306-D (mx. W 145759 – 2)

.

JOHNNY DUNN & HIS BAND [Jelly Roll Morton, piano]: Ham and Eggs [Big Fat Ham]

New York: March 13, 1928
Columbia 14358-D (mx. W 145760 – 2)

.

The Antique Phonograph Gallery • Victor Junior (1906 Advertisement & 1907 Grace Wiederseim Illustration)

Introduced in 1906, the Junior was Victor’s cheapest talking machine at the time, originally retailing for $10. The ad below announced its impending arrival on July 1 of that year.

Six months later the Junior was featured on the cover of the Victor Records supplement. Although the illustration is unsigned, a note in the catalog confirms it is by Grace Wiederseim, creator of the Campbell’s Soup Kids (Campbell’s Soup being Victor’s Camden neighbor; its factory whistle spoiled a few masters in the early days).

Although the Junior reputedly was used in some premium schemes, we’ve not yet tracked down any specifics in that regard. The machine remained available until 1920, by which time it was retailing for $12. The Junior is uncommon today.

.

MSP_victor-jr_composite

Original catalog courtesy of John R. Bolig

.

The Playlist • Earl Hines & his Orchestra (Chicago, 1929)

MSP_vic_V-38096-A

 

EARL HINES & HIS ORCHESTRA: Grand Piano Blues

Chicago: October 25, 1929 — Released December 20, 1929
Victor V-38096 (mx. BVE 57322 – 2)
The common Bluebird reissue of this recording used an anemic-sounding dubbed master; here’s “Grand Piano” as originally issued, before RCA’s engineers wrung the life out of it (albeit a bit noisy, having spent many years in a Nebraska barn before being recently rescued).

.

EARL HINES & HIS ORCHESTRA: Chicago Rhythm

Chicago: February 22, 1929 — Released April 19, 1929
Victor V-38042 (mx. BVE 50511 – 2)

.

EARL HINES & HIS ORCHESTRA: Beau-Koo Jack

Chicago: February 15, 1929
Victor unissued take (mx. BVE 48887 -1)
From a c. 1960s custom vinyl pressing from the original stamper. Take 2 was issued on Victor V-38043 (released April 19, 1929)

__________

Discographic data are from the original RCA files, courtesy of John R. Bolig. Details of all of the Victor V-38000, V-38500, and other Victor race records are available in John’s mammoth Victor Black Label Discography, Vol. 4, available from Mainspring Press.